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Always the bridesmaid and never the bride...

Discussion in 'Personal' started by anon1369, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. I have just discovered I have been offered a job interview (yay). However I am starting to get to the point where I want to give up.
    I qualified in the summer but have yet to start my NQT year, this interview will be my fifth. On the one hand I know in the long run 5 isn't that many but I just get the feeling that I will never be the one actually offered the job. But it's frustrating when you keep hearing about people getting the first job they apply for. Around my way there are over 100 people applying for each post and although I can write a good application I'm sure they must be dissapointed when they see me in person as I don't 'shine'!
    I am really fed up of the job hunt now and the endless hours filling out application forms. I especially hate when you arrive at an interview and can already tell which person will be getting the job before you even start.
    My interview performance has improved with all this practice but I still get terribly nervous at interview and I know I don't talk for long enough. I would just like to be given the chance to start my NQT year and prove myself.
    What can I do to make myself the bride? Sorry for the whinge but I am losing hope!
     
  2. I have just discovered I have been offered a job interview (yay). However I am starting to get to the point where I want to give up.
    I qualified in the summer but have yet to start my NQT year, this interview will be my fifth. On the one hand I know in the long run 5 isn't that many but I just get the feeling that I will never be the one actually offered the job. But it's frustrating when you keep hearing about people getting the first job they apply for. Around my way there are over 100 people applying for each post and although I can write a good application I'm sure they must be dissapointed when they see me in person as I don't 'shine'!
    I am really fed up of the job hunt now and the endless hours filling out application forms. I especially hate when you arrive at an interview and can already tell which person will be getting the job before you even start.
    My interview performance has improved with all this practice but I still get terribly nervous at interview and I know I don't talk for long enough. I would just like to be given the chance to start my NQT year and prove myself.
    What can I do to make myself the bride? Sorry for the whinge but I am losing hope!
     
  3. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    It took me 9 to get my first post! lol. Just keep at it.
    Do you get feedback? xx
     
  4. It took me 6 or 7 interviews to get my first teaching job. All my friends got their first one. Don't worry. You have to go into each job thinking that this is the one. If you go into it thinking you won't get it, you will not come across as enthusiastic, and will be stand-offish even though you don't mean to be. More than anything, heads tend to be looking for someone who will fit in, as well as teach, so you need to be chatty and fun with the existing staff.
    Think about the questions that you have been asked before. Write your answer down and make sure you have some clear points for each question. This will help you recall when you are asked the question. Think about your unique selling point. Can you run a club, do you have activities that you do outside of school? Are you part of any teams that show you are a team player? You need to stand out; being unique is as important as being "bubbly" and "shining."
    When you are in schools, interact with the children. If it is primary, make sure you crouch down to speak to smaller children. Smile at adults and introduce yourself, especially to the admin staff and TAs. They will be asked their opinion too.
    Make sure your appearance is smart. Wear a suit, make sure hair is smart. Look good. I know it shouldn't be the way, but if you look smart and like you have made an effort, it shows that you care about the job and really want it. Also, I always say that no one ever got turned down for a job for wearing a suit, but if it comes down to 2 identically good candidates, and one is wearing a suit and the other is less smart, who do you think is going to get the job?
    Anyway, these are my interview tips. I am sure some will disagree, and others will have more tips for you. Good luck, don't give up and keep your chin up. You did your training for a reason, because you want to be a teacher. Don't throw in the towel after a few rejections. You have to believe that those jobs were not right for you, and that is why you did not get them.


     
  5. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Must be where I went wrong, I don't even own a suit! [​IMG]
     
  6. I know it sounds daft. I didn;t wear suit for my first 5 or so interviews, as I thought it was too formal. But I wasn't getting the job. I spoke to my friends; they had all worn suits. So I decided to go out and buy a suit. And bam, I got the first job I wore it to. That's not to say that I have got every job I wore a suit to, but I think it helps. Get yourself to H&M; they have pretty cheap suits.
     
  7. Please forgive the typos. You get the gist.
     
  8. Shag the Headteacher - it's always worked for me.

    cyolba, giving away trade secrets :)
     
  9. Thanks for all the ideas, sorry I have only just had chance to come online.
    Yes I always get feedback but its always pretty rubbish to be honest and the person giving me feedback always contradicts themselves. I have been told that my lesson was good but interview not so good, excellent lesson and interview but they chose someone else, they went for someone more experienced, the other person was better and so on and so forth. The feedback is never consistant as they all seem to be looking for different things!
    Regarding the suit, I did wear one to my first interviews, however I have expanded and it no longer fits and I hate them and feel really uncomfortable in them so I tend to wear a suit style dress instead as I feel much more comfortable. I know I should be thankful that I am at least getting interviews, but I dread the part where I find out I was unsuccessful as I always get really upset!
    haha nice tip, might try this next!
     
  10. gergil4

    gergil4 New commenter

    DEFINITELY disagree with the suit idea. Never worn one and only now, as I'm old and too expensive have I struggled to get a job (but am now employed). Personally I think a suit looks too formal - how many people actually teach in a suit? Wear what you are comfortable in is the main thing.
    I have the same problem about not saying enough - but that's true of me as a person, not just at interview, if I feel i need to say something I will, but i'm not an idle chatterer!! I have used the "Is there anything you'd like me to elaborate on?" tactic for this reason. Also, there's nothing wrong with a small pause for thinking time before you answer - as advised by a DHT once.
    Good luck
     
  11. You're right! It's nothing! I mean this kindly, but seriously - five interviews are eff all.

    I was talking to my PT at a long term supply job I had last year, and I was whingeing about the fact Scotland is up sh*t creek with regard to teaching jobs. He informed me that he had FORTY interviews before he got his first permanent job, and that was before things got bad.

    Good luck though, you have my total sympathy.
     
  12. As it is a while since you qualified, they might ask what you have been doing for the past six months or so. You need to make sure that you don't sound as if you have been resting on your laurels - try to show that you have used the time wisely and have gained relevant experience/ insight into the young people you are going to teach etc. My mum was a teacher who was made redundant at 54 and had to take part time work at a local factory. She was able to turn this to her advantage by saying that she felt she needed to spend some time engaging with ordinary people away from teaching and had gained great insight into the daily lives of parents (mainly mums) with kids, who worked a twilight shift to bring in extra cash to eke out the family budget.Maybe it wasn't the only reason but it may have helped her get the next job in teaching she applied for. Voluntary work always looks good on the CV too.

     

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