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ALAN Literacy and Numeracy

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by tortuman, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. Hello there. In my school we are just introducing these tests for low ability students. In the past I have worked in FE teaching Literacy and Numeracy for adults and I've been using the materials published by the government and their reference grid.
    The Alan tests seem to be the same as the old Adult Literacy tests, but when I did one on screen to see how the results came up, the references to the curriculum don't tie up with the referencing system in my Adult Literacy materials.
    Has anybody used ALAN before?
     
  2. Hello there. In my school we are just introducing these tests for low ability students. In the past I have worked in FE teaching Literacy and Numeracy for adults and I've been using the materials published by the government and their reference grid.
    The Alan tests seem to be the same as the old Adult Literacy tests, but when I did one on screen to see how the results came up, the references to the curriculum don't tie up with the referencing system in my Adult Literacy materials.
    Has anybody used ALAN before?
     
  3. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    We do them - <u>all y11 and y10</u> have to take them - it boosts the results!
     
  4. ALAN stands for Adult Literacy and Numeracy, which would explain the parallels!
    Many schools do them because they are offered at Level 1 (D-G GCSE equivalent) as well as Level 2 (C grade GCSE equivalent), and are far less involved than the traditional GCSE's in English and Maths, but instead show understanding of basic skills to a certain level.
    Its worth noting, if you are just bringing these qualifications in, that they are currently being phased out and the providers will no longer be offering them. They are being replaced in favour of Functional Skills, (English, Maths and ICT) which are designed for students to acquire and apply basic skills (to both L1 and L2, like the ALAN's)
    HTH,
    Juliet
     
  5. The level 2s have been pushed as an additional GCSE to B grade
    To be fair, some of the numeracy was quite functional and less 'candidate friendly' than the current foundation GCSE papers.
    What always makes me chuckle is tyhat these are done very often with one in the afternoon followed by the remining one the next morning...
    So why is it that we teach GCSEs for 2 years when they can be done by a complete year group over a 24 hour period with next to no work in the build up?
    IIRC around 50% of our cohort passed both L and N tests whether they were level 1 or 2.
    Of course the pupils have had much delight in changing the acronym ALAN in a way of voicing their general regard for another bit of paper
     
  6. I think the kids at my school are too illiterate to move the letters around. And I hadn't realised either.
     
  7. Moomin Troll

    Moomin Troll New commenter

    For four years at my old school we did these (I moved on from there 18months ago) - we did them solely as a method of increasing our GCSE average points scores (as explained by others above). Typically we entered every student in Year 11 (230+ of them) you do not pay for them to do the exam until they log on, and it used to be £7.40 per sitting - not sure of cost at the moment - but it was deemed a good return for the financial investment.

    With regard to curricular links, as the content is not the same as the standard Maths / English Syllabuses followed in KS4 we made sure that the students all did the online practice / revision tests. Parents were informed of these by letter also to aid "home learning" (when that actually occurred!) Towards the end of my time there, we used Maths and English staff to do a last minute 'revision session' in the hour directly before the exam took place, this did also increase the pass rate.
     

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