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Agencies in London still touting for supply teachers

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by albertdog, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. Some weeks ago, someone wrote to to this Forum, describing how he had put his CV on some job site and subsequently was plagued by cold-calls from Supply Agencies tempting him to register with them.
    I made the same mistake by signing up with both the E-Teach and Reed online job-finder sites. How the latter operates is a mystery to me; despite making applications for literally dozens of teaching jobs in schools through this site, I have heard nothing more from any of them. Indeed, some of the jobs advertised seem to have been there for a very long time, given how desperately teachers are looking for work.
    Anyway, back to the point. Yesterday, another agency phoned me, giving the usual line that 'we have noticed your CV on a website' and 'since you are the sort of teacher for which we are looking, I wonder whether you are still looking for work'. Since, I thought, I have very little to lose by being 'assertive', I asked him a few questions.
    When I asked him on which website he had seen my CV, he claimed not to know as the information had only been 'passed on to him'. He said that what had attracted my CV to him was the subjects I taught (maths and science) and my experience (over thirty years), which, he claimed were 'much in demand' by schools; apparently experience and being British-trained are especially valued.
    When I told this 'consultant' that I had been told a similar story by over two dozen agencies over the last nine months, and that twenty-plus agencies with which I had registered between them had only found me two days work, he expressed amazement, claiming to have five schools on his desk at the moment, all looking for maths or science teachers. The market for maths and science teachers, he said, was 'bouyant'.
    When I asked what charges were involved in registration, he assurred me that there were none, except for the CRB check, the agency liking to 'do there own' as 'schools demanded it of them.'
    Reluctant to leave the call without result, he said that he would send me an -e-mail, in case I 'changed my mind'.
     
  2. Some weeks ago, someone wrote to to this Forum, describing how he had put his CV on some job site and subsequently was plagued by cold-calls from Supply Agencies tempting him to register with them.
    I made the same mistake by signing up with both the E-Teach and Reed online job-finder sites. How the latter operates is a mystery to me; despite making applications for literally dozens of teaching jobs in schools through this site, I have heard nothing more from any of them. Indeed, some of the jobs advertised seem to have been there for a very long time, given how desperately teachers are looking for work.
    Anyway, back to the point. Yesterday, another agency phoned me, giving the usual line that 'we have noticed your CV on a website' and 'since you are the sort of teacher for which we are looking, I wonder whether you are still looking for work'. Since, I thought, I have very little to lose by being 'assertive', I asked him a few questions.
    When I asked him on which website he had seen my CV, he claimed not to know as the information had only been 'passed on to him'. He said that what had attracted my CV to him was the subjects I taught (maths and science) and my experience (over thirty years), which, he claimed were 'much in demand' by schools; apparently experience and being British-trained are especially valued.
    When I told this 'consultant' that I had been told a similar story by over two dozen agencies over the last nine months, and that twenty-plus agencies with which I had registered between them had only found me two days work, he expressed amazement, claiming to have five schools on his desk at the moment, all looking for maths or science teachers. The market for maths and science teachers, he said, was 'bouyant'.
    When I asked what charges were involved in registration, he assurred me that there were none, except for the CRB check, the agency liking to 'do there own' as 'schools demanded it of them.'
    Reluctant to leave the call without result, he said that he would send me an -e-mail, in case I 'changed my mind'.
     

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