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Age limit to work abroad

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by jolet, Dec 7, 2018 at 11:48 PM.

  1. jolet

    jolet New commenter

    Is there an age limit for a teacher to work abroad. Would some schools abroad take people over 65?
     
  2. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    It varies quite a bit according to the destination country's visa policies, etc. Many countries have some type of age limitation (Singapore and HK is 60 or thereabouts as I recall). Some countries have a policy but people still manage to get hired, visas, etc.

    This links to another forum's take on the subject. It's probably dated and not necessarily accurate but it's a good starting point:

    http://www.internationalschoolsreview.com/nonmembers/age-article.htm
     
  3. miketribe

    miketribe Occasional commenter

    Many schools in Europe hire people over 65, but it's not all that common. My school has quite a few. Including me...
     
  4. SPC2

    SPC2 Occasional commenter

    If it was, not now. No limit, save school imposed. I say this with 100% confidence.

    The Singapore work ethic doesn't really do retirement..or leisure - although the Singapore 'work ethic' is very enthusiastic about sick days and lunch hours (...note the plural). For example, many food courts, condos and MaccyDees have local septuagenarian staff, and expats aren't spared the assumption that they'll happily work until they drop.

    While the good news is there's no age limit, the bad news is heavy competition for jobs, and younger is usually cheaper.
     
  5. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    I believe Italy, France and Spain are available. Though many elder statesmen use their retirement savings to supplement their meager income in those locales.
    Other European locations may be more amenable.
     
    dumbbells66 likes this.
  6. rosaespanola

    rosaespanola New commenter

    My father-in-law has been teaching in China until very recently, and he's now 68. He was working at local schools/colleges/universities rather than international ones though.
     

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