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After getting a new job, at which point do you resign?

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by PETERPIPER, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone,
    Just need a bit of advice, please. I have two job interviews lined up next week. If I am verbally offered one of the jobs, is it risky to hand my notice in to my school straight away or should I wait to sign a contract with the new employer just to cover myself?What have other people done?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    Just need a bit of advice, please. I have two job interviews lined up next week. If I am verbally offered one of the jobs, is it risky to hand my notice in to my school straight away or should I wait to sign a contract with the new employer just to cover myself?What have other people done?
    Thanks.
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Once they offer you the post and you accept, assuming they are teaching jobs, then it is good manners to resign officially as soon as possible. Your current HT cannot advertise for a new member of staff until they have your resignation. to keep them hanging on is just rudeness, imo.

    However if you dislike your current school and want to cause them as much trouble as possible then you can leave off handing in your resignation until the last day of May.

    Don't wait until you sign a contract, you might be waiting forever. I've never ever had a contract before actually starting at the school, and I've taught in 7 different schools in 4 LAs.
     
  4. Thanks for the reply. They already have someone to replace me - someone on a temp contract who is happy to go permanent. I've told them I'll tell them asap if I get either job- but I don't know if that should extend as far as formally resigning if I don't have a concrete offer in writing. They are not teaching jobs, they are with local authorities, hence me not being 100% sure if a verbal job offer is enough for most people to hand in their notice...
     
  5. I would wait until you have a written offer. Some LAs (at least in Scotland) make an initial offer as "preferred candidate" - ie it is dependant on references and any checks that need done (CRB etc). If this is the case with your new job, you should wait until you have a confirmed offer in writing, as preferred canddiate status can be revoked in some circumstances.
    Good luck with the interviews
     
  6. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    When they offer you the post and you accept ask them to let you know in writing (email is fine) as soon as possible so you can resign from your current post. Make out that you NEED the written offer.
     
  7. Thanks for the advice :)
     
  8. I would wait for thecontract - most say subject to CRB/satisfactory references etc. I do know of someone that did resign due to being offered a job, but then had the offer retracted - apparently the reference was not quite up to the mark.... but he was effectively jobless.... and then only option was supply until another position came up around October...
     
  9. Exactly why I posted - I have a very good friend who resigned after being given a verbal job offer, only to have them say that to restructuring / budgets the post was 'no longer viable' - but that they'd keep his info on file should another job come up. How kind (!).

     
  10. hello i would say once you have been offerd the job in the post etc then it would be a good time to resign from your job you do have.
     

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