1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Advice please?

Discussion in 'Retirement' started by mill12, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    Hi, I'm looking for some advice. I have been teaching for 25 years entering the profession later in life. I have just turned 58 and have just had a knee operation which has kept me off work since Christmas. Prior, I was looking into retirement at 60 but feel that my retirement date may need to be brought forward. Once retired I would be due to £14,000 approx plus lump sum or £1150 approx if I took an enhanced lump sum. My question is: would I be able to do a couple of days supply after receipt of this, if I needed to supplement my income? Also, if I were to retire early on ill health grounds, would I be entitled to the same pension or would it be enhanced?
    Thanks in anticipation.
     
  2. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    You've practically no chance of getting enhanced ill health retirement - it's incredibly difficult to get and you have to be able to prove that you're totally incapable of teaching any more. It's unlikely you can if it's a bad knee, because the school can make 'adjustments' to enable you to carry on teaching.

    Yes, you can do supply thereafter - you'll (obviously) pay tax on it.
     
  3. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    There is also exam marking. Have you considered part time ? Supply is vary variable, depends upon the subject and area. I would hope that it would be a bonus rather than a necessity?
    I assume that you have, but if not focus on all of the advice on the TPS.
     
  4. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    Thanks for the replies. Middlemarch: the doctor in OH seems to be a little more positive about this!
    Wanet: yes I have considered this. The advice on TPS is useful and I will also be speaking to a rep from Wesleyan quite soon. Thank you
     
  5. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Seriously - I'd be extremely surprised, given my long experience of seeing those who do apply for it - and the few who actually get it.
     
    lindenlea likes this.
  6. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    If you retire BEFORE 60, you can do as much supply work as you want and TPS won't want to know about it. If you retire at 60 or later, you DO have to tell TPS about any other work and it MAY affect your pension.
    Always check with them.
     
    Yoda- and mill12 like this.
  7. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    "You must inform us immediately if you take up any teaching employment by completing a Certificate of Re-employment."
     
    mill12 likes this.
  8. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    Dunteachin this is great advice thank you. Exactly what I was looking for.
     
  9. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    Thanks Wanet. I appreciate your citing.
     
  10. old_dobbin

    old_dobbin Occasional commenter

    It's not clear whether the 14,000 a year pension is what you would be paid at 60 or at your current age.
    Whatever your pension is when retire, you need to be able to survive adequately on that pension alone, because supply work isn't guaranteed : there are some reports that supply has become hard to find and that schools are using TA's instead of qualified teachers to fill gaps. Because you've asked the question, I suspect your pension may not meet all of your normal expenses comfortably. You have quite a few years to wait until your state pension kicks in-so doing what you can to be paid and have your TP contributions paid as long as possible would be of benefit to you. How much longer might your knee problem keep you off sick?
     
  11. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    My knee problem has been ongoing until now. Occupational health gave said they will support a phased return to work but school is talking about capability through ill health. My Union is now involved!
     
  12. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    I would go with the health professionals with the support of your union. Try to go back to work on a phased return, it is not the school decision to talk about your capability to work.

    If they want you out, make them pay for it! (union advice for this)
     
    mill12 likes this.
  13. mill12

    mill12 New commenter

    Applecrumblebumble I don't understand. I thought it was the school decision of at least that's what my head was waving at me in my meeting the other day. She said (quote) it was her only choice because there has been disruption etc.
     
  14. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Occasional commenter

    If you are unable to do the job you were employed to do, even after allowances, adjustments and support following advice from your OH specialist, the school i.e. your Head has every right to look at capability to sack you. What other choice do they have? Your Union should be able to advise on the likelihood of early retirement due to ill health. You clearly need time to adjust to work and for evidence to be collected that you can't do the job so you might be able to string it out for another period of time and again, your Union will be able to advise. Do you want to do that? Are you in pain? Is it a real problem for you now carrying out your duties? Are you likely to improve? Do you still enjoy the job? Is it fair on pupils if you are not 100%? Do you want to go through the capability process? An extra 2 years on your pension is only going to add an extra four or five hundred onto your pension. Is it worth the extra hassle for this amount? Perhaps your Union can negotiate a sum to leave quickly and quietly. Maybe you are better off just accepting it is time to retire? Do you want to do supply? It's not a walkover, guaranteed or easy, but depending on your subject and area, you might be able to do short term contracts. Are you up to doing supply? You could retire before you are 60 with a slightly reduced pension and do any amount of work you like on supply without having to tell TPS or it affecting your pension. You could look at exam marking, moderation etc or just retire. I suspect £14k would be more than enough to live on but have you sat down and done a proper detailed accurate budget of your monthly incomings and outgoings? This is surely crucial in the decision making process and knowing whether you can afford to retire.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2016
    plot71 likes this.
  15. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    The health professionals have indicated that you are fit to return to work on a phased return. They will advise the school what provision needs to be in place to support your return to work. The school needs to follow this advice and not threaten you with capability. You are fit for work or not that's where you are at the moment. It is a medical assessment not capability due to poor teaching. As Middlemarch said not much chance of any enhancement on your pension due to ill health.
     
  16. old_dobbin

    old_dobbin Occasional commenter

    [QUOTE="Luvsskiing, post: 11671993, member: 744377 An extra 2 years on your pension is only going to add an extra four or five hundred onto your pension. Is it worth the extra hassle for this amount? .[/QUOTE]
    How did you work that out? The OP says he's been teaching for 25 years and so may well be earning about 40k or more. If he were earning 40k, two years' pension loss would be £1,000 a year , PLUS he would suffer an actuarial reduction of about 5% for each year that he retired early. He says his pension would be £14,000 so that seems to confirm that he is earning over 40K as he says he has 25 years' service. I think he would lose over £2,000 a year for life by taking an AR pension at age 58. Of course he would also lose the salary ( minus pension) that he could have earned. If he lives to the average retired teacher age of 87, he would lose at least £60,000 by taking an actuarially reduced pension.
    Is there anything to lose by trying to get the ill health pension?
     
  17. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    If you are determined to retire (assume yours is the thread in WD) fight for the school paying your contributions for the next 2 years or there about.
     
    Yoda- likes this.

Share This Page