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Advice please...

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by jen4877, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. jen4877

    jen4877 New commenter

    Hi There,

    New to this but have read lots of good advice from other problems in search for an answer so here goes.

    Last year I got an internal post as Head of Year in a fringe Grammar. My interest at has always been teaching and learning, I love teaching and I'm very enthusiastic about my subject. I have found this year very challenging. In fact I have been pretty miserable. I haven't really received an allocation for the HOY post, and dealing with behavioural issues inevitably often makes me late for class, my planning is shocking and my marking has suffered (even though I still dedicate the majority of my weekend to it). Basically I feel I am a poorer teacher than I was last year, which I hate, and my work life balance (in term time) is none existent. I really feel like I should take a step back and wait for an opportunity within my department, but I don't want it to look like I'm giving up. I do feel valued at my school and would hate to leave, but that's also a possibility for the right position. Should I speak to someone regarding the allocation and persevere with the position? Or take a step back and try and get into what I really want to do on the academic side of things? I've spoken to a couple of trusted colleagues but they have an affiliation to either the pastoral or academic side so i feel I get a biased opinion.

    Any help would be appreciated :)
     
  2. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    .
    Whatever you decide you want to to do, do bear in mind that you cannot just unilaterally tell the head you don't want to be HoY any longer and walk away from it. You need to discuss with head and step away from it only with head's agreement.

    Do you get paid a TLR for it?
    .
    .
     
  3. jen4877

    jen4877 New commenter

    Thanks for your reply. Of course, I should have made it clearer that this is a decision for September but our school is taking staff intentions for next year now, so just want to be ready for the impending conversation. It does have a TLR yes.
     
  4. londinius

    londinius New commenter

    I understand your position. I was Head of Year for 20 years, and by and large it was a role I enjoyed very much. Then, out of the blue, my new Head of Department decided that she did not want to continue doing the job. I was asked by the Head to take it over on a trial basis, to enable the existing HOD to step down, and I agreed, on the offchance that a change really is as good as a rest. I struggled during my first year as HOD, and was considering stepping back down , when I found out that my elevation from Acting HOD, to HOD, had gone through on the nod without me being asked whether I wanted this to happen, and the acting Head of Year who had taken over my role was made permanent. So my old role wasn't there to go back to. I hadn't enjoyed my first year as HOD at all - hated it, in fact, and my second year, for the first 6 months was worse, and I was completely stressed out for the first time in my 3 decades of teaching. It got so bad that I did the only sensible thing - I talked to my Headteacher. He referred me to occupational health - which was useful - and showed great understanding and support. We planned how to make things work as effectively as we could, and a way of gradually easing me out of the role. This year I found I've grown a little more into the job - but I have to say that knowing I won't be doing the HOD's job from this coming September onwards has been a great weight off my shoulders.

    So I guess that what I'm saying is: -
    * Talk to your headteacher. That is one of the things that he/she is there for. Explain exactly how you feel. He/she will maybe be able to look at things from a different angle, and may see solutions that you can't, because you're too close to the problem.
    * Maybe set yourself a time limit - decide NOW whether you can afford to give it another year. If not, then you have to say. If so, then set a time aside when you are going to look again at your feelings about your position - and if it hasn't improved then, well, you've given it a fair go.

    Whatever your decisions, I really wish you all the best.
     

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