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Advice on Asperger's please

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by ADUX, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. I am a Scout leader and we have a 13 year old with Asperger?s. It is relatively mild supposedly but he is noticeably detached from the other kids, is happy to sit on the periphery of any activity and yet craves to be the centre of attention; he is overshadowed in many respects by much younger children

    I?ve read somewhere that Asperger?s can be characterised (amongst other things) by physical clumsiness yet this child is quite sporting and physically very dexterous ? is this symptom absolute?

    I don?t presume to contest the diagnosis, but have never encountered this condition (I?m not yet in education) and would be grateful for some advice on how to manage the condition and child so that he wants / is able to be more involved in the activities.

    Any practical advice or pointers to further resources would be appreciated
     
  2. I am a Scout leader and we have a 13 year old with Asperger?s. It is relatively mild supposedly but he is noticeably detached from the other kids, is happy to sit on the periphery of any activity and yet craves to be the centre of attention; he is overshadowed in many respects by much younger children

    I?ve read somewhere that Asperger?s can be characterised (amongst other things) by physical clumsiness yet this child is quite sporting and physically very dexterous ? is this symptom absolute?

    I don?t presume to contest the diagnosis, but have never encountered this condition (I?m not yet in education) and would be grateful for some advice on how to manage the condition and child so that he wants / is able to be more involved in the activities.

    Any practical advice or pointers to further resources would be appreciated
     
  3. Wotton

    Wotton Occasional commenter

  4. Hello, ADUX. I have Aspergers Syndrome myself. It does not surprise me that he is happy to sit on the periphery of activities but yet craves to be the centre of attention. Many people with Aspergers Syndrome want to have friends and join in but the social rules and complexities of social situations scares us off so it's easier for us to sit in silence and observe what is going on. The social world is very frightening for someone on the autistic spectrum as it has no rules-what works in one situation does not work in another and, for people who function in such a logical manner, it makes no sense so they (including me) tend to withdraw. Regarding the physical clumsiness aspect, I have very poor coordination skills and my manual dexterity is also severely affected but not every person with Aspergers is clumsy-it's a secondary characteristic that is not essential for diagnosis. There was a boy at the Sunday school I attended as a child who excelled at football but had severe Aspergers Syndrome. I agree with Wooton-talk to the parents and also to the child himself to find out what works and the level of interaction he is happy with-remember that this will vary from day to day depending on his mood, health etc. Some days, I will chat readily to anyone who makes conversation with me-other days, I won't even want to leave my room-remember that people with Aspergers learn social skills the way most people learn intellectual skills so, when we are tired, stressed or anxious, our ability to interact with people drops. Remember to involve the child as well-he is the expert on his condition as he is the one who lives with it every day. Good luck!
     

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