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Advice needed urgently please!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by rebeccadavies9, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. Hi there,

    I'm a Year 1 teacher who is being observed tomorrow for Literacy. Despite being happy with my ideas for the lesson, the focus is progression for writing and is being observed by deputy and sip.

    I am starting a new unit: Traditional and Fairy Stories. Therefore I am worried about the expectation to see writing in the lesson. I think they are expecting a piece of writing. Or at least sentences etc. I wondered if anyone could help put my mind at ease that talk for writing and engaging them in the new unit is all part of progression for writing?

    Anyway, here is my idea for the lesson as it stands now... any advice greatly appreciated, and any ways I could sneak more writing into it would be great.

    Start off telling chn WALT: We are learning to talk about Traditional Stories. WILF: I know features of traditional Stories.

    Then tell chn today we are going to be detectives. show chn large piece of paper with setting on it (Woods and cottage scenery) and tell them a crime has happened here, ensure they know what crime means. Ask the chn what the setting is and record next to 'Crime scene'. Now tell chn we need to find the people involved but all they have left is this (Red cape) and (sharp tooth). who could they belong to? ask chn for characters then establish the criminal (bad) is the wolf. and the victim (good) is red riding hood. Talk about what is different about the characters, one is nasty, kind etc (synonyms) Then ask chn if they know what has happened here. what was the crime? wolf ate granny. ask chn what happened after that, did anyone help, what was the solution? woodcutter saved LRRH from the wolf. Record all these ideas around the crime scene. Draw characters. Label the synonyms for characters. Maybe even ask for wow words for the settings? What is the story: Little Red Riding Hood.

    And then in groups, half the class working on a different crime scene (JAck and teh beanstalk, goldilocks, Rapunzel, 3 Billy goats gruff) and chn either to write on big poster and share writing and drawing,

    or would you give them their own sheet to record on?

    I Was wondering whether I should give lower a chance to write on their own or they help me to scribe. by giving them whiteboards and pens and asking them for initial sounds at the very least and encourage them to use phase 2 sound mats to help me spell all the words.

    I'd encourage the middle - higher chn to write synonyms on their sheets or poster for the characters (good- which words means the same and bad - which words mean the same), and add descriptive words to the setting around the picture.

    I would have half the class working in continuous provision areas and then swap around (2 highest groups working independently once I have checked they are all on task)

    Then bring back together at the end and put posters at the front. Lets look at our wilf: I know features of Traditional stories. All the crime scenes today were from traditional stories. Lets see what all these stories have that are the same. They all have a crime scene - a setting, they all have a good (victim) character and a bad (criminal) character and they all have a problem that gets sorted out (solution). Explain these posters will go up on working wall and we now have a list of important features for traditional stories.



    Any advice please? I always thought and people have agreed that progression for writing isn't just about producing a piece of writing... and that this lesson is getting the chn engaged in features of traditional stories which will help them progress in their writing when it comes to needing to produce a piece of writing. Also using synonyms or allowing chn to use wow words for setting is all part of progression for writing because they are talking about language they could then later use in their stories... anyway... the more I have thought about this... the more I have confused myself.

    anyway... if you have taken the time to read this thankyou. And if you can help clear any of this up or add any more ideas, Thank you again :)

    xx
     
  2. Hi there,

    I'm a Year 1 teacher who is being observed tomorrow for Literacy. Despite being happy with my ideas for the lesson, the focus is progression for writing and is being observed by deputy and sip.

    I am starting a new unit: Traditional and Fairy Stories. Therefore I am worried about the expectation to see writing in the lesson. I think they are expecting a piece of writing. Or at least sentences etc. I wondered if anyone could help put my mind at ease that talk for writing and engaging them in the new unit is all part of progression for writing?

    Anyway, here is my idea for the lesson as it stands now... any advice greatly appreciated, and any ways I could sneak more writing into it would be great.

    Start off telling chn WALT: We are learning to talk about Traditional Stories. WILF: I know features of traditional Stories.

    Then tell chn today we are going to be detectives. show chn large piece of paper with setting on it (Woods and cottage scenery) and tell them a crime has happened here, ensure they know what crime means. Ask the chn what the setting is and record next to 'Crime scene'. Now tell chn we need to find the people involved but all they have left is this (Red cape) and (sharp tooth). who could they belong to? ask chn for characters then establish the criminal (bad) is the wolf. and the victim (good) is red riding hood. Talk about what is different about the characters, one is nasty, kind etc (synonyms) Then ask chn if they know what has happened here. what was the crime? wolf ate granny. ask chn what happened after that, did anyone help, what was the solution? woodcutter saved LRRH from the wolf. Record all these ideas around the crime scene. Draw characters. Label the synonyms for characters. Maybe even ask for wow words for the settings? What is the story: Little Red Riding Hood.

    And then in groups, half the class working on a different crime scene (JAck and teh beanstalk, goldilocks, Rapunzel, 3 Billy goats gruff) and chn either to write on big poster and share writing and drawing,

    or would you give them their own sheet to record on?

    I Was wondering whether I should give lower a chance to write on their own or they help me to scribe. by giving them whiteboards and pens and asking them for initial sounds at the very least and encourage them to use phase 2 sound mats to help me spell all the words.

    I'd encourage the middle - higher chn to write synonyms on their sheets or poster for the characters (good- which words means the same and bad - which words mean the same), and add descriptive words to the setting around the picture.

    I would have half the class working in continuous provision areas and then swap around (2 highest groups working independently once I have checked they are all on task)

    Then bring back together at the end and put posters at the front. Lets look at our wilf: I know features of Traditional stories. All the crime scenes today were from traditional stories. Lets see what all these stories have that are the same. They all have a crime scene - a setting, they all have a good (victim) character and a bad (criminal) character and they all have a problem that gets sorted out (solution). Explain these posters will go up on working wall and we now have a list of important features for traditional stories.



    Any advice please? I always thought and people have agreed that progression for writing isn't just about producing a piece of writing... and that this lesson is getting the chn engaged in features of traditional stories which will help them progress in their writing when it comes to needing to produce a piece of writing. Also using synonyms or allowing chn to use wow words for setting is all part of progression for writing because they are talking about language they could then later use in their stories... anyway... the more I have thought about this... the more I have confused myself.

    anyway... if you have taken the time to read this thankyou. And if you can help clear any of this up or add any more ideas, Thank you again :)

    xx
     
  3. char2505

    char2505 New commenter

    Hi Rebecca,
    I absolutely love your idea of a crime scene and may be pinching it myself one of these days! If it was my lesson I would probably stick to just one feature of trad tales (in this case settings) and leave characters for another time. You shoul def be able to make the case for talk promoting writing progression, and I would prob mention this to the observers explaining I was at beginning of unit before they come in.
    Good luck x.
     
  4. Thank you char2505 for taking the time to read and for the piece of mind :)

    I was told to stand my ground on the talk for writing. And I did mention to deputy who will be observing that it was the start of a new unit. He then replied with can you do a distance learning lesson and revisit a different unit you have done before and do a piece of writing!!!! Year 1 do a big piece of writing without all the talk for writing!!!!


    The only reason I wanted to include all the elements, crime scene, characters etc was because it's an introductory lesson and just I wanted to see which stories the chn already knew, basically guess the story from the props and start getting them to think about what we know about traditional stories. I didn't want to do much more than that but because the focus is writing i thought I'd better include some focus on adjectives for setting or synonyms to explore that we have good and bad characters and then revisit this in more detail when we do character profiles and lessons about settings.

    If I was to explore settings in more detail... Do you and anyone have any exciting ideas or ways forward with this? I just have some sparkle box small world backdrops stuck to big poster paper at the minute but if i wanted the chn to explore settings more in this lesson I would feel like i've not given them enough to go off describing the settings just using this.

    Thanks again :) xx
     
  5. Hi Rebecca,

    I loved some of your ideas, and may also be using some of them if I get the chance!

    Just a quick thought, do you have any PC's in the classroom for use during continuous provision? If so, I taught '3 little pigs' recently and used the TES I Board which had some brilliant 'setting', 'character' resources on. The children loved it, you can focus on 1 scene and change the furniture/characters etc and add speech bubbles to them. I've just looked and there's one for The Gingerbread Man which might be useful? Just a thought anyway, good luck with your observation!
     
  6. I forgot to add the link, sorry! http://www.iboard.co.uk/player/frameset.htm?id=32412
     
  7. thanks redplatty,

    unfortunately... since October I have acquired 2 class computers from the old computer suite.. but they are still waiting to be set up for use. They don't work!!! Very irritating when you write in the ict log book every week. I had planned to use ICT in areas of provision as my lesson doesn't include ICT, the only ICT I am using is a letter from Traditional story police station to ask the chn for help!

    But thankyou for the link. I can use it when / if my computers get fixed!!!

    I am just in the process of thinking how I can make my class look more like a crime scene... so far... I have a setting on a poster which I will stick up and around it put a display border as police tape :)
     
  8. My comment is that you have clear in your own mind what you want to achieve but there seems to be alot of content? How would ususally introduce a unit? Make sure you do not confuse your children and your observers.
    Can you concentrate on one story?
     
  9. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    You poor thing!
    These stories are meant to be enjoyed/feared/loved. They are part of our childhood. Ask yourself if you had to analyse them as you expect these children to do.
    I'm sorry to sound so negative but I think little children learn about 'Story' by hearing lots of stories, not by analysing one to death.
     
  10. That's ok. Advice is what I wanted and I do understand your points.

    Although I do know what I want to do. I know the chn will enjoy it. I know the chn will be able to tell me what all these stories have in common by the end and they will like using the clues and discussing the stories. It isn't a massive analysis. It is in a nutshell what the framework suggests as well... comparing Traditional Stories.

    I am giving the chn a picture of a setting and 2 props for a story and asking them where, who, what happened. it is as simple as that. Its basically guess the story from the props. They will be recording on a writing frame and drawing characters and adding a few extra details just to show writing for the people observing.

    But it is merely to get them thinking about which traditional stories they know and showing them what they all have in common and the next day we will be reading one of them and using role play etc.

    They came up with spongebob and all sorts the other day as traditional stories when I asked them if they knew any. So thought a good first lesson would show them the kinds of stories I meant when I said ?traditional story?.
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I strongly believe that children learn the features of stories by hearing them - the more, the better. But many people will disagree with me.
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Are you sure the children know the stories? It is a sad fact that many children and adults have limited knowledge of fairytale/traditional stories. Disney has a great deal to answer for ...[:[​IMG]
    I don't think our children have enough opportunities to listen to stories just for pleasure and for some bedtime stories have been replaced by dvds
     
  13. comenius

    comenius New commenter

    I did something similar with my year 1 class to start the unit off. We filled in a large chart together for 'The Princess and the Pea'. Large sheet of sugar paper with an image form the story in the middle, one corner was for characters, one for language, one for setting and one for magic. I read the story first, then lots of partner talk to add notes for each heading.
    Then in their groups they each had a different fairy tale to do. Top 2 groups had Jack and the beanstalk and Cinderella, and had to decide how to organise the information themselves on their poster (making sure to include the 4 categories) they also had several books of the story for reference.
    The other groups worked with an adult, on Rapunzel, Rumplestiltskin and Sleeping Beauty.
    They all really enjoyed doing it and felt like detectives, finding the clues in the stories.
    The at the end each group shared what they had found out and we discussed similarities and differences between the fairy tales.
     
  14. Thank you for the reply comenius really positive and makes me feel like I'm not the only one going for this approach to the new unit. I think it is you who has shared lots of creative planning for topics on the resources... and I am a big fan of your work and am using and adapting all those ideas :) A big thank you to you!!

    Your idea sounds brilliant too. Even more tricky than the ideas I had. I will stick to my big posters - just made them for Goldilocks, Three billy goats gruff, Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the beanstalk, and rapunzel. I have put on my posters...
    Crime scene (setting): ________
    Victim (good): _________
    Criminal (bad): _________
    Crime (problem): ___________
    Solution: ______________

    and have given each group a different one to look at.

    I have got 3 bowls and spoons as props for goldilocks, a red cape and sharp teeth for lrrh, a witches hat and plait of hair for rapunzel, gold coins and a cow for jack and the beanstalk, a tuft of grey hair and a 4 toed footprint for the three billy goats gruff.

    I was going to put out the story books for the chn at the front to help them predict which one of the stories they have for their crime scene. I could always just bring the specific book to the table, read it together first and then discuss the crime scene... or do you think they would be able to guess from just the props. Just need to make sure timing is spot on. they will be in for 45 mins and I have 6 groups to get through.

    Thanks again comenius. feel better now :) xx
     
  15. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Crime scenes for four-year-olds?
    I'm sorry but I think you're complicating things unnecessarily.

     
  16. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I'm not having a go - I think your ideas are really creative - I just think that we're in danger of doing things to death when they might be better done in a more-the-merrier way.
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/nationalstrategy/literacy/getfile.php?src=1374/Plot+Patterns+Handout.pdf
    point 1
    Bring Back the Daily Class Reader
    The class reader is one of the key ways in which we tempt children into reading. It is the prime way
    in which we establish a ‘reading climate’ – by putting them through the imaginative challenge of
    engaging with good literature. New authors can be introduced and books read that are beyond the
    children’s decoding level. The teacher models enthusiasm and interpretation, savouring the
    narrative. If we want children to write well then they need to hear what good writing sounds like! The
    Primary Strategy calls this, the ‘Read Aloud Programme.’
    point 2
    Introduce Daily Storytelling
    Some schools now include daily storytelling as a routine across Key Stage 1. They aim to build up a
    bank of well-known tales as well as developing the ability to innovate and invent new stories. At Key
    Stage 2 many schools are ensuring that children work on a told story each half-term. In this way,
    children would have retold and developed a bank of some 50 stories by the time they leave primary
    school.
     
  18. char2505

    char2505 New commenter

    I think if approached at their level, with a policeman character, saying that he is cross that lots of bad things have been happening in Traditional Tale land, and he needs the childrens' help to catch the baddies, then Y1s could get on board with the whole CSI slant! Good luck again -I know I'm guilty of obsessing when I have an observation. I'm sure you are a good teacher, so if you do what you feel comfident with it will be fine!
     
  19. Just want to say thanks for all the advice everyone...

    I woke up late this morning... alarm didn't go off!!! I had time to get dressed and brush teeth and I was out of the door. Had occupational therapist waiting to talk to me whilst i needed to get my obs lesson set up then my ta missed input because a girl in my class had an accident...as well as all this...when i did actually get to school as well...i hadn't even zipped up my dress haha!!! So i just set myself up for a fail...


    But after all that worrying... the lesson went really well... my deputy and sip lady were both impressed, in her words 'an asset to the school and a star in the making!' and I got graded outstanding!!! I am very very happy and feel like I shouldn't doubt myself so much in the future. Thanks again for all the support :)


    xx
     
  20. forestje

    forestje New commenter

    Recently I was looking at traditional tales with my Y3 class and was surprised at how many of them did not know many of the old tales.
    I chose one of them and we studied it and looked at the components of a traditonal tale.Hopefully they will go away and read more of them.
    Keep it simple and enjoyable comes to mind.
     

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