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Advice needed for a private tutor please - child mirror writes

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by lucie19, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    Hi I need some advice please. I privately tutor a Yr2 2 who is very behind. We have started work on letter formations and although he is fine when I stand over him as soon as he has free reign he begins to write backwards. I don't mean he gets his b and d mixed up. He actually writes backwards from right to left with each letter perfectly backwards. His handwriting is pretty good when he writes like this and you can read it perfectly in a mirror.
    He is left handed and I wondered if this has any bearing on it. Has anyone come across this before? I have worked with many SEN children but never seen this before. Any suggestions would be welcome. Thanks.
     
  2. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    Hi I need some advice please. I privately tutor a Yr2 2 who is very behind. We have started work on letter formations and although he is fine when I stand over him as soon as he has free reign he begins to write backwards. I don't mean he gets his b and d mixed up. He actually writes backwards from right to left with each letter perfectly backwards. His handwriting is pretty good when he writes like this and you can read it perfectly in a mirror.
    He is left handed and I wondered if this has any bearing on it. Has anyone come across this before? I have worked with many SEN children but never seen this before. Any suggestions would be welcome. Thanks.
     
  3. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    Could be another Leonardo! The thing that would worry me more is that he may be considering everything starts on the right. Obviously writing is a problem but it affects organisation more when presenting information etc. since 1st to him will be on the right and he may be told he is wrong when he thought he did what was required. If the R-L movement pattern is solidly established it affects understanding of anything in rows - 1st, last, before, after...
    If that's not a problem, at least things aren't as bad as they could be! If he really likes pulling the pen (rather than pushing it as left-handers have to moving L-R), he might adopt the fairly common LH approach of holding the LH above the writing line with the wrist 'crooked' so the pen can be pulled - this usually looks to observers as tho' the person is writing upsidedown but the end result can be incredibly neat. Only hazard is ink that doesn't dry quickly enough because the wrist will smudge it.
     
  4. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    Oh dear I hadn't even considered that. I will test him on organising this week to see which way round he organises things.

    Apparently his year 1 teacher decided that he wasn't really left handed and tried to force him to write with his right hand (I thought this went out with the 11 plus!) I wondered if this has confused him. I was thiniking of getting him to write like most left handed people with his wrist above the line and seeing if it made writing left to right easier.

    Di wonder if this might be a form of dispraxia or similar
     
  5. I worked with a child who used to write upside down, nothing I did (showing correct letter formation etc) made a jot of difference.
     
  6. Riv

    Riv New commenter

    I used to do this. I wasn't usually aware of doing it though. I "cured" myself by drawing my margins in green pen or putting small dots on the left of my paper before I started anything (green for go) and trained myself to always start on the green side. I also always wear a R ing on my R ight hand. I am right handed but was forced into it from a very young age (pre school) by having my left hand tied up in scarves and the like.




    I'm sure you know this but ..for left handers it's often helpful to put the paper on their left quite away from the body and at an angle so their hand doesn't "jam up" against their body as they write towards themselves.. right handers write away from the body into free space. Also, it helps if left handers sit on the left of a right hander at a desk or table.
     
  7. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    But not at the LH edge/corner of the table without adequate space to rest their LH wrist!!!
     
  8. Hi,
    I have been teaching an autistic child for about 4 years now and he has had some very extreme ways of 'playing' with writing and reading.I can remember one of the first things he could do was to be able to handwrite everything backwards. When first starting to read and write, I don't think he really understood what reading and writing were for but with a brilliant visual memory he was quickly able to learn the shapes of letters. He could then write an entire phrase or sentence completely backwards for example 'sdrawkcab yletelpmoc'. Using the computer he went on to be able to write each letter in pixels perfectly. We kept on emphasizing the meaning of words, rather than individual letters, and used a scheme called 'Sounds Write' which brings together reading and writng through words. He has come on leaps and we are very proud of his progress.
     

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