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Advice leaflets for parents who want to support reading.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by dzil, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    I work in a secondary special school and our parents find it very hard to get into school regularly for may reasons, distance being one of the major issues. Many parents want to support their children with reading and expect regular homework. As all of my students are working below level 3, and most are below level 1 but are aged 11 and over, taking home "standard" reading books is not an opton (lack of good age appropriate books and embarasment of pupils with a "baby" book infront of siblings and peers in the street for one thing.) Conventional English homework tasks are also quite tricky. If parents could or would come in so I could show them specifics it would be great, but this is proving impossible.
    I want to produce a "guidelines for helping reading" leaflet to give to parents who want ideas to support reading. Do any of you wonderful people know of any good ones already produced that I could look at and adapt please? Your own version or something commercially produced?
    I'm thinking of the ones you sometimes find in libraries, early years and schools and childrens centres aimed at beginning readers parents. The type that sugest reading lables in the supermarket, pointing out environmental print, reading to children and reading infront of them, enjoying reading and not doing it when you are tired or with the TV on and that 5 minutes a day is far more use than two hours in one session.
    Any other ideas you have would be welcomed too.
    If you want to e mail me something, leave a message here and I'll PM you with my e mail address.
    Thanks
     
  2. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    I work in a secondary special school and our parents find it very hard to get into school regularly for may reasons, distance being one of the major issues. Many parents want to support their children with reading and expect regular homework. As all of my students are working below level 3, and most are below level 1 but are aged 11 and over, taking home "standard" reading books is not an opton (lack of good age appropriate books and embarasment of pupils with a "baby" book infront of siblings and peers in the street for one thing.) Conventional English homework tasks are also quite tricky. If parents could or would come in so I could show them specifics it would be great, but this is proving impossible.
    I want to produce a "guidelines for helping reading" leaflet to give to parents who want ideas to support reading. Do any of you wonderful people know of any good ones already produced that I could look at and adapt please? Your own version or something commercially produced?
    I'm thinking of the ones you sometimes find in libraries, early years and schools and childrens centres aimed at beginning readers parents. The type that sugest reading lables in the supermarket, pointing out environmental print, reading to children and reading infront of them, enjoying reading and not doing it when you are tired or with the TV on and that 5 minutes a day is far more use than two hours in one session.
    Any other ideas you have would be welcomed too.
    If you want to e mail me something, leave a message here and I'll PM you with my e mail address.
    Thanks
     
  3. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    Hi, I have just written a 'Reading Advice letter' for my parents which I put together from lots of different sources - would be happy to email it to you and then you can take from it what you like.
     
  4. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    Thank you Balse. Your leaflet sounds just what I need. I have a few old leaflets and many ideas but nothing recent. I expect to put something together to fit my students needs, I just lack some sources and inspiration :) I've sent you my e mail in a PM.
     
  5. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    Would it help to have some worksheets with a short reading piece that then has comprehension questions at the end? If so, I can send you some links. Also see "Guided Reading Questions" by Sarah Clements at this link: http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/english/englishE3.htm
     
  6. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter


    <font size="2">Hi Chocolate, Your links look good for more able pupils but they are too complex for my needs. My pupils have severe or profound learning difficulties. Our aim is to get readers to a reading age of 7 by the time they leave us at age 19. We often succeed. We start with pupils aged 11 who are complete non readers, some more able may be able to read "a", "the" and their own name. We occasionally get a couple that can read a short sentence like "the cat sat on the mat" sometimes one of them can read and understand it, but that is the exception.</font>
    <font size="2">Many of our year 7s have learned that they can't read or that print does not make sense so have learned to ignore it. (in spite of the hard work put in by our primary feeder school) They rarely see adults reading and usually, by the time they are in secondary, parents who once read to them have stopped.</font>We have to overcome this barrier as well as teach reading. Many of our parents want homework to support their youngsters but don't have much time to spend. I'm going to write a little leaflet showing how a few minutes every day whilst carrying out everyday chores can be really valuable . things like spotting environmental print, pointing out clearly when you are reading (e.g. recipes, packet instructions, road signs, texts, facebook) finding sight words in newspaper and magazine articles (how many times can you see "can" in that column of "metro"?; when's Corrie on tele?) and for those with a bit more time and patience; how to choose and read something with a youngster, what to look for, how to tackle a non fiction book, all the "early years" stuff that provides a good foundation and supports what we are doing in school.
     
  7. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    Hi Singora,
    Thanks for the link. The parents information on here is useful as a resource. I know I've got to develop my own as what I need is very specific, but looking at what others have done is a real help.

    Chocolate,
    just found the "toolkit" in the link you sent me. I'd missed it when I checked out the link before. It will be really useful thank you!!
     
  8. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    There are apparently quite a few apps for ipad now which teach reading by phonics and are fun. Would this kind of thing be useful or useless as they will not have ipads?
     
  9. Start from there.
    Show them <font color="#0000ff">www.englishspellingproblems.co.uk/html/sight_words</font>
    and laugh with them at the stupidity of English spelling.
    Spellings like 'on only once' or 'plough through tough stuff' are insane.
    Explain what learning to read English involves:
    learning the main letter-sounds and decoding them with words like 'a fat cat sat on a mat' or 'stop on hot spot'
    but then learning to read more and more words by sight instantly, without decoding.
     

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