1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Advice from those already on GTP please

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by jennylouisebond, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. Could any people on the GTP, particularly Primary, please tell me a little more about how the course runs in terms of your learning? How do you learn how to be a good teacher? With the PGCE you get a lot of university time and I'm just wondering how much support you get on the GTP, or are you just expected to get on and teach? GTP with PGCE would be my preferred route which I have an interview for but I think I'm feeling a bit wobbly and doubting my suitability. I know you are expected to teach right from the beginning which obviously I would be lying if I said I wasn't nervous about that, but I am happy about it. I just wondered whether you are literally just expected to go in and start teaching and how much learning time you get for your own development and how that is given to you? I do have lots of experience and despite my wobbles I think I would be good for the GTP, but I want to make sure I get the best out of my teacher training which means choosing the right course.

     
  2. Could any people on the GTP, particularly Primary, please tell me a little more about how the course runs in terms of your learning? How do you learn how to be a good teacher? With the PGCE you get a lot of university time and I'm just wondering how much support you get on the GTP, or are you just expected to get on and teach? GTP with PGCE would be my preferred route which I have an interview for but I think I'm feeling a bit wobbly and doubting my suitability. I know you are expected to teach right from the beginning which obviously I would be lying if I said I wasn't nervous about that, but I am happy about it. I just wondered whether you are literally just expected to go in and start teaching and how much learning time you get for your own development and how that is given to you? I do have lots of experience and despite my wobbles I think I would be good for the GTP, but I want to make sure I get the best out of my teacher training which means choosing the right course.

     
  3. cupofteacher

    cupofteacher New commenter

    I believe all providers are different, but will share my experience with you. In each of the places I was interviewed at they had x amount of time where trainees were required to go to training sessions. these varied from weekly sessions, to a fortnight at the beginning of your training. You will be asked to identify your areas in need of development and essentially you are in charge of your development. your school based mentor should assist you with this, and also should assist in directing where to look to help your development, and may also point out areas for development you had not considered.
    You learn by making mistakes. That is at the heart of both PGCE and GTP I personally feel. You won't learn how to be a good teacher in a lecture room, but you will learn from doing an awful lesson!! similarly the good lessons!! It is less theory based, and you have to find out the theory yourself some of the time, but I guess it depends on what your requirements are...if you prefer to learn the theory and then try it, PGCE is probably for you...if you prefer to get stuck in and just go for it then I would say GTP. You learn an awful lot about how to be a good teacher from observing other teachers too.

     
  4. terri1972

    terri1972 New commenter

    Hi there. The way GTP courses are run are really very different. I know people who have had nearly 30 training days, and some (like me) who have had 5!! You do have to be pro-active and it is really hard work. It's difficult to advise because things are so different. We have had to do 4 "training tasks" (essays; presentations) and detailed training plans for each term.

    I think the level of support depends on your school based trainer and your tutor - I have been very lucky on both counts! I have really loved the GTP. (ALso on our course, we teach 40%, 60% then 80% for each term.)
    Good luck in whatever you decide
     
  5. I am a GTP student, I started training last September but taught unqualified for a year before that. GTP students are supposed to be supernumerary, therefore you'll be with a qualified teacher during lessons at all times. You'd begin observing, team teaching and finally teaching on your own gradually over the year. However, many schools (including) mine don't do it like that and I was thrown in at the deep end, teaching alone from the start with a full timetable and a tutor group.
    I've done most of my learning through self study, reading books (ebay is great for picking up cheap books), watching Teachers TV, getting advice from colleagues, subject specific websites, teaching websites, forums and observing teachers (not necessarily teaching my subject). The uni lectures are also quite helpful. Like it's been said on the other response, you learn through making mistakes. Like creating a recipe, throwing in lots of ingredients and experimenting with it you'll soon find out what works and what doesn't and adapt it each time you create it until you get the right balance and it works for you and your pupils.
    Your school mentors and tutors at uni are always there to support you and offer advice, so despite being in a room on your own with 30 kids, there's a massive source of support and information out there to help trainees.
    Good luck. : )
     
  6. Thank you for your very helpful responses. I really like the idea of the way the GTP runs but my biggest fear would be being placed in a school with a not so positive, and not so pro-active ethos, or with a mentor or school who just wasn't supportive. That would affect my whole teacher training. But if it goes well, and in theory it should, then I like the idea of getting to know your class, learning hands on and using lots of reflective practice. This suits me down to the ground. I'm hoping I'll be ina position to choose my preferred course. Although I am slightly worried how schools are going to fund GTP trainees this year and what the uncertainties with regards to school budgets may mean for GTP students. It's ok having the funding for the university to train us but what about the schools who are having to cut budgets and staffing? I absolutely know for sure that I want to be a teacher and so am not put off by any of it and I am trying not to worry too much. I guess my timing could just have been a little better for applying!!
     
  7. Hi Jenny, I am currently studying on the GTP and although it is really hard work, I'm glad I chose this route instead of the PGCE. You get the first half term to observe teachers, not just in your school but in other schools too. You get this time to have any meetings with people or to go on courses that your school may think will benefit you. During this time you will have become a well known face in the classroom, you will know all of the children's names and you will more than likely have a good understanding of their abilities. After half term, you and your SBT (School Based Tutor) will have a chat and you will sort out what lessons you feel confident in teaching. Remember it is only 40% of the time and everyone will have had a nightmare with their first few lessons, even the best of them!!
    You also get lots and lots of support from the GTP consortium itself and you will live for the taught sessions, normally once a fortnight. Here you meet up with people going through the same as you and everyone shares ideas, it's really helpful! You get out of it what you put into it but I really feel like the support is there if you do need it!!
    Hope this helps! [​IMG]
     
  8. Thaat does help Jacqueline and that's just how I hoped a GTP would be! I really hope that my course runs like that. I desparately want to get as much out of my training as I can so that I can give my best as a teacher. It really worries me when I hear of unsupportive schools/mentors/tutors. I would be so disappointed. Hope I'm going for a place on the same course as you or at least one that's equally as supportive.
     

Share This Page