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Advice for prospective GTP mature candidate please.

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by youngbill, May 3, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    Can anyone offer any advice, preferably personal experience about the GTP for more mature candidates please? I'm just trying to weigh up my odds and decide whether to leave my current job or not, and what if anything I can do to improve my chances. I'm a senior manager in a police force and looking to leave on my 50th birthday, and I want to train to be a primary school teacher, preferably KS2. I'm male which I am led to believe is an under represented group, and I've got a degree in psychology and a mixture of O, A levels and NVQ's in different disciplines.
    Much as I would like to, I can't do the PGCE as I have 5 kids, all under 18 who need supporting. I've been considering the GTP as it seems to be the only way I can train and earn even a small salary at the same time. My wife is a teaching assistant so can help with some financial support but not enough to put me through uni for a year.
    I've got 2 years to go, and intend to start working voluntarily in a local primary (not my kids school) to get some experience but realistically, what are my chances of getting accepted onto the course, and if I qualify - what are my chances of getting a job afterwards? I know what the government site says about starting on the GTP but I also know I fell for that when I joined the police, only to have the rug pulled from under me 25 years later. I don't want to spend 2 years spending all my spare/family time getting experience to find I haven't a chance in Hell.
    Any advice and comments postiive or otherwise are welcome,please be gentle, this is my first post as I'm just starting out....
    Thanks
     
  2. Sorry, this is my second post not my first - It was the responses to my first post that led me to consider GTP in the first place.
    Thanks

     
  3. I don't know about the GTP as I have not applied but I do believe it is very competitive and that you would probably need some teaching experience to be successful. That is the reason I have not looked into it much.
    However, I am a single parent with 3 kids and I have applied to do the PGCE. I will have to give up my job but I will expect to get child tax credit which is about £50 per week per child plus council tax paid plus a maintenance grant,student loan and hopefully a bursary. You might even qualify for income support so check out an online benefits calculator and student finance pages. The directgov website is a good one to start off with.
     
  4. I don't know about the GTP as I have not applied but I do believe it is very competitive and that you would probably need some teaching experience to be successful. That is the reason I have not looked into it much.
    However, I am a single parent with 3 kids and I have applied to do the PGCE. I will have to give up my job but I will expect to get child tax credit which is about £50 per week per child plus council tax paid plus a maintenance grant,student loan and hopefully a bursary. You might even qualify for income support so check out an online benefits calculator and student finance pages. The directgov website is a good one to start off with.
     
  5. I am a mature student using my redundancy to (largely) finance the PGCE I will start in September.
    I also got accepted onto a GTP at one point but it fell through a few weeks later when the training provider said there was no funding for my subject.
    That's one issue - full funding is hard to come by. The other thing is that GTP's are very hard to get in the first place and depend usually on having first worked in a school in some capacity. That will probably mean working on a low wage as a TA or similar for a year or so with no guarantee of subsequnety being taken on for a GTP - as opposed to just biting the bullet and getting on a PGCE.
    There seems to be a bit of a contradiction with the GTP - on paper it should be great for mature entrants but the requirement o demonstrate commitment to a school (fair enough from the school's point of view) actually serves as a deterent for career changers,
    Having said all that, my experience was with secondary in a non-shortage subject (history) - so maybe others can advise ?
     
  6. GTP places are difficult to come by, especially in primary. Funding has been slashed and many providers are concentrating on secondary shortage subjects like maths, physics and chemistry. You do sound like a good candidate however you will need a good deal of experience before you apply, many primary GTP candidates have had paid roles in schools like teaching assistants etc. The primary jobs market is also very difficult at the moment with hundreds of applicants for each post and many unemployed teachers doing the rounds of short term contracts and supply.
    What is your degree in? Could you teach in secondary?
     
  7. Advice from someone going through the primary GTP application process at the moment. It is long and quite painful. Very competitive. Lots of clearly suitable candidates for only a small number of places (at least on the course I am applying to). Applied early December 2011 and we are into May and I have not yet heard whether I was successful or not. Just thought I'd give you a heads up- you may want to consider the application process when you are weighing up the pros and cons. I think the PGCE tends to be a much snappier process and perhaps not quite as competitive. I know there are different options with regards to maintenance grants and loans. Good luck with whatever decision you make!
     
  8. As an unqualified teacher, your pay will be relatively low. The school will get less than that amount to take you on and will therefore have to find between £1k and £3k from its budget to do so. Primary schools have smaller budgets than secondary schools and so are less able to absorb the extra costs.
    There are other ways such as part time PGCE's where you are in school/university for 1 or 2 days a week, leaving the other days to work to support your training. These tend to be 2 or 3 year courses.
    Good luck
     
  9. All of these answers have been tremendously helpful so thank you everyone. I'm glad I asked as it seems it's going to be more difficult to get into than I thought. I do have a number of qualifications in maths, (O level, Advanced 'O' level, A level and First University Exam grade and all A grades) so it might be easier to get into secondary level as a maths specialism. I really do want to do KS 2 though, so would it be possible to do the GTP in secondary maths and then once I've got some experience, move to KS2 ???
     

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