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Advice for an EU trained teacher

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Ula_B, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Hi

    I am an oversees trained teacher. I gained my undergraduate qualifications in teaching English Language and Literature as well as Translation and Interpretation in Poland, about four years ago. Since coming to England I have worked in all sorts of different places. Currently I am a website translator and developer for a small wholesaler. I am also finishing my MA Degree in English Language and Literature at The University of Sheffield. I have attained a QTS last year and according to the GTC I should be seen as a home trained teacher (since my BA Degree has been completed in Poland). For the past year I have been applying for all sorts of teaching jobs, both full time and temporary and on several different levels. I can teach any year including English Lang/Lit on a secondary level, however I have not even had a callback from anyone. When I tried registering with some teaching agencies I was told I need six weeks of UK experience minimum in order to be on their books. On my QTS it states I am exempt from serving the statutory induction period, as I have already served it in Poland. The jobs I applied for were mainly for NQTs and therefore did not require years of experience. I have even spoken to an adviser from the Sheffield City Council and they assured me that my qualifications are sufficient to start work as a teacher.

    I would like to know what do you think about this and if there is anything here that I might be missing? I would love to go back into teaching, the only thing is, I cannot afford to do supply (unless it's for minimum one full term).

    Any advice will be much appreciated.

    Ula
     
  2. Hi

    I am an oversees trained teacher. I gained my undergraduate qualifications in teaching English Language and Literature as well as Translation and Interpretation in Poland, about four years ago. Since coming to England I have worked in all sorts of different places. Currently I am a website translator and developer for a small wholesaler. I am also finishing my MA Degree in English Language and Literature at The University of Sheffield. I have attained a QTS last year and according to the GTC I should be seen as a home trained teacher (since my BA Degree has been completed in Poland). For the past year I have been applying for all sorts of teaching jobs, both full time and temporary and on several different levels. I can teach any year including English Lang/Lit on a secondary level, however I have not even had a callback from anyone. When I tried registering with some teaching agencies I was told I need six weeks of UK experience minimum in order to be on their books. On my QTS it states I am exempt from serving the statutory induction period, as I have already served it in Poland. The jobs I applied for were mainly for NQTs and therefore did not require years of experience. I have even spoken to an adviser from the Sheffield City Council and they assured me that my qualifications are sufficient to start work as a teacher.

    I would like to know what do you think about this and if there is anything here that I might be missing? I would love to go back into teaching, the only thing is, I cannot afford to do supply (unless it's for minimum one full term).

    Any advice will be much appreciated.

    Ula
     
  3. marshypops

    marshypops New commenter

    Have you registered with their NQT supply teacher pool?
     
  4. Hi
    I have emailed an application form for the Sessa Agency, which is a non-profit supply agency based within the council, however I have not heard from them.
    Ula
     
  5. dumpty

    dumpty Lead commenter

    Your qualifications are 100% official and recognised - don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Have you tried registering with private agencies, that is those who are not part of the council offices, or linked to councils? Normally private agencies will find work for you as it is in their interests to do so, not least as their long term workers often have a list of schools they won't work at.....so along comes you and they will use the 'well, we have to see how you cope first' line. You get work, albeit at real sh-it schools for a while, they get more money. This is also a great way to build contacts at schools, and many supply teachers have landed full time contracts as the school gets to know you at low risk, and over time before offering you a job.Hope it works out for you - don't give up!
     
  6. Thank you :) I have tried private ones and it was those, that asked for the six weeks UK experience. I am secretly hoping it will get easier once I've finished my MA in September, but until then it's web processig for me :)
    Ula
     
  7. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    This is what I did.
    I'm not going to lie and say that it's easy but it got results.
     
  8. Thank you for all the advice. I know it's not going to be easy, but if you want something you'll get there eventually :) I'll keep trying and I might just challenge the 'six weeks' thing if the agencies mention it again.

    Thank you
    Ula
     
  9. Link to the other post:
    https://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/469942.aspx
     
  10. I may have completely misunderstood the situation but to summarise you are a native Polish speaker with undergrad qualifications from Poland in English langauge and lit. In addition to that you have QTS status from Poland and are studying for an MA in Sheffield.
    Now I am a native English speaker with undrgrad quals in French/Spanish and a UK QTS. Now if I was to apply for a teaching job in France or Spain it would be to teach English. No-one in France is going to employ me to teach French to French students. There would be so many others around who would be more suitable for the job.
    If I have understood correctly this is the problem there are so many native English speakers who want to do the job.
    Maybe you should concentrate on getting a job for TEFL. I actually think that you are at an advantage in that context. What about MFL do you speak any other languages? There are a number of adult Polish classes in this area. It is not a full time job but it would give you some experience.
     
  11. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    There aren't any njobs in TEFL at the moment, language schools are laying off teachers, you also need CELTA or TESOL or pref DELTA. I've not had work for 6 months and now am doing voluntary work with English in the Community.
     
  12. OK, I did n't know. So when you think about it the job scene does not look bright in any direction. I am so glad that I am out of the job market. It makes me realise how lucky I am.
     
  13. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    I'm qualified for EFL and have QTS, I can't find any work. The language schools are suffering because of the stupid visa law, doesn't apply to EC students, but the numbers from the Middle and Far East have shrunk by 75%, disaster for teachers, schools, universities and host families.
     
  14. Bare in mind I am referring
    to teaching about literature, and/or grammar. These are things that
    only someone with a qualification in it is able to teach, not someone
    who happens to be a native speaker, and maybe did hardly any language
    stuff at Uni. I reckon having looked at a language from the outside
    gives a certain advantage. One of the things that's hardest about
    learning about the grammar of your own language is that you never have
    to think about it. Some natives would struggle to get their head around
    the content of the curriculum as much, if not more, than a non-native
    speaker. Also, at my level of language proficiency we are talking about
    bilingualism and not first or second language aspects.
     
  15. landaise

    landaise Occasional commenter

    So you should know homonyms, then : bear in mind !
    Otter is correct, no headteacher would consider employing a foreign national to teach English in a school in England. You are living in cloud cuckoo land, especially with the current job situation.
    You have made several mistakes in your posts, things like prepositions, that highlight the fact that you will not be considered for a post teaching English.
    This may sound harsh, but it's cold hard fact.
     


  16. Normal
    0







    I am indeed aware of those. I never
    said I was perfect, nor will I ever make such claim. Sometimes, when writing in
    a heat of the moment, one can make a mistake. My previous post was not an
    attack on native speakers. I understand the claim about experience and your
    concerns about a foreign teacher teaching English, however I would suggest
    having an open mind in order to see how ‘an outsider’ sees your language. I am
    confident in my abilities and will carry on pursuing my goal.



    I do also have a friend (with
    similar qualifications to mine) that decided to take the PGCE way out of the
    situation. She is a Polish teacher in England, teaching Y3 and things are going
    well for her.



    As I mentioned previously, I will
    finish my MA and see what happens then.



    And
    to address some of the previous issues regarding foreign teachers in Poland, I
    would be proud to know that someone took time and effort, not only to learn my
    language, but also to master it and learn about my culture.
     
  17. anotherauntsally

    anotherauntsally Senior commenter

    Bit of a sweeping statement is it not? Are you judging the quality of someone's English on the strength of a few posts? Are you saying that posters who teach English in the UK always have perfect grammar and spelling? And if this is the criterion, many on here who call themselves English teachers must be lying then? Or, just maybe, they take more care at work?
    Interpreters are often needed by schools/LAs in areas where the parents have little English. Are you in an area with a large Polish population? Obviously not what you want to do permanently but LA and HTs would get to know you. EAL teacher? I know interpreting isn't in their remit but might it not be thought be useful to have someone on the staff who speaks the language and understands the culture of a large number of the EAL pupils?
     
  18. I was going to suggest looking into EAL teaching too - I think you would have exactly the understanding of learning the language that those students need.
    I have taught German to foreigners here in Germany (DfA is what we call it, the equivalent of EAL) (I am bilingual, but seem to spend my life in that strange perpetual state that Brits think I am German and Germans think I am a Brit. My German has a slight trace of English pronunciation (-er endings) and my English has a trace of German pronunciation (the way I pronounce a short "a" plus sentence structure, as I am always sticking verbs in the wrong place - i.e. I am weird).
    It is a very interesting line of teaching - don't dismiss it completely without looking into it (I have also taught EAL in International schools).
    And it would at least get you into a teaching post and you may find from there that you could get some hours teaching literature too and take things from there.
     
  19. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Experienced secondary head's reaction: to be brutally honest, I'd only consider calling someone like the OP if there were not enough suitably qualified native English candidates for the post. If she were a teacher of maths or science, however, it might be a different story.
     

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