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Advice for a disruptive ks1 class- assigning carpet spaces?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by bumble-bee89, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. I'm going to be starting my NQT year in September and I've met my (fairly challenging) class. They seem to be fairly disruptive on the carpet and certain children really need to sit away from each other. Even the children who are well behaved seem to sit in inappropriate places where they are distracted by others. I am considering setting places for each child to sit in when they are on the carpet so it can be controlled who they sit next to, has anyone done this? If so, how did you set it up?
     
  2. I'm going to be starting my NQT year in September and I've met my (fairly challenging) class. They seem to be fairly disruptive on the carpet and certain children really need to sit away from each other. Even the children who are well behaved seem to sit in inappropriate places where they are distracted by others. I am considering setting places for each child to sit in when they are on the carpet so it can be controlled who they sit next to, has anyone done this? If so, how did you set it up?
     
  3. Tell the children that you want them to be able to see and hear really well so that they can learn - push this aspect, that it is to help them with their learning, ask them to find a place where they are not going to be distracted. Move them around a little so they are in 'rows' which makes it easier for you to make a plan. Insist that they stay in their 'carpet seat' and only swap two people if you have to. They are quite honest at this age and will soon say if children who shouldn't be together are sitting too close! Some classes like to design and colour their own carpet seat which can be laminated so they have a special spot to sit on.
     
  4. indecisive1

    indecisive1 New commenter

    hi i teach 5/6 at the moment but when i taught 3/4 i always had carpet places regardless of the class. it worked for me! set it up at the start of the year and insist children sit in the correct place.
     
  5. as a rule - children can concentrate for their age + 1.
    limit carpet time.
    as a year 1 teacher with a very fussy class ( we are talking fussy from fussy land) - i have very short carpet sessions, teach small groups, have regular mini plenaries and group plenaries.
    it is hard for the less fussy children and they deserve your attention - not the mischief makers.
    ( hope i don't sound too pious!)
    i find carpet squares just as bad as the behaviour - children curl them , pick at them and move them!
     
  6. I use carpet spaces - we spend a little while on the first day getting arranged - tiny ones and ones who might need my face right next to them (!) at the front then in rows going back. Usually the tallest at the back, with the chatty ones spread out as much as possible! Once they are arranged I ask them to look at which row they are in and who is next to them.
    Then we have a game of 'walk around the room and...quickly sit in your place!' to make sure they know where to sit.
    I find it works well as you are not constantly saying 'x, you can't sit with y,' and you know they can all see you well. Also it is easy to see if anyone is missing after playtime. Do change them around every so often. Maybe for storytime or something let them sit where they like so they can rush to sit riiight next to your feet!
     
  7. I set carper spaces but change them each half term. It takes a while to work out who should sit next to who and changing them means that as you get to know your class better you can "refine" who they sit next to. I keep a plan so that anyone covering my class knows who should be sitting where...
     

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