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Advice about a change of direction

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by kitty2, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. Hi
    After many years in a dull job where I could feel my life slipping away, I went back to University to do a PGCE. I couldn't get a job at first, and ended up in a temporary post where I was very unhappy. I was delighted to get a new job in a lovely school last September, and at Christmas I completed my NQT year. Despite having a couple of very challenging children in my class, I mostly love my job and enjoy being with the children. In many ways, it is all that I hoped it would be. However, it is also every bit as stressful as people warned me it would be, and I am disposed to be quite a worrier. Combined with this, I seem to be ill all the time. I'm starting to get to the point where I'm wondering if it's all really worth the stress and the impact on my health. I can't just leave my job (financial commitments, etc., etc.) and I don't want to go back to a mindless office job where I spend the day watching the clock, so does anyone have any ideas what else I could do with a PGCE? Sorry for the long post!
    Thanks.
     
  2. Hi
    After many years in a dull job where I could feel my life slipping away, I went back to University to do a PGCE. I couldn't get a job at first, and ended up in a temporary post where I was very unhappy. I was delighted to get a new job in a lovely school last September, and at Christmas I completed my NQT year. Despite having a couple of very challenging children in my class, I mostly love my job and enjoy being with the children. In many ways, it is all that I hoped it would be. However, it is also every bit as stressful as people warned me it would be, and I am disposed to be quite a worrier. Combined with this, I seem to be ill all the time. I'm starting to get to the point where I'm wondering if it's all really worth the stress and the impact on my health. I can't just leave my job (financial commitments, etc., etc.) and I don't want to go back to a mindless office job where I spend the day watching the clock, so does anyone have any ideas what else I could do with a PGCE? Sorry for the long post!
    Thanks.
     
  3. One thing you can say about teaching is that you are never bored. If being bored in your job is a problem for you, then stay in teaching. Personally, after 30 plus years of not being bored I could stand a little ennui in my job.
    The downside of this is that you are not bored because you are run off your feet, stressed out (and you can't say you weren't warned), multi-tasking like a demented octopus and subsumed in a very demanding job. There is a bt of job satisfaction in there too but usually you are too tired to appreciate it. And yes, your health will suffer.
    I wish I'd known ten years ago that it was time to get out....when you find out what you can do with a PGCE please let me know.
    I don't think you have given teaching much of a go yet, but I would say .... run away now, as fast as you can!!

     
  4. I disagree with this - after years of teaching, I regularly feel bored! It's incredibly routine: day divided into regular slots, same break and lunch times, same room, always on the same site, teaching similar things repeatedly, following a spec or curriculum, routine marking of the same piece of work x 30...

    I guess it all depends on whether you find yourself satisfied by the variety which stems from no two lesson being identical. For the very, very creative - say those who once worked in advertising or similar fields - teaching can be highly restrictive. And yes- I am looking to leave!
     
  5. gud4age

    gud4age New commenter

    hi,

    Same situation finally got a job in good school, but thinking can I do this for years? No its too bloody hard . no life , too many late nights. Leaving in summer to do something else anything! Oh and going to take holidays in term time again without getting ripped off. On a Sunday night I am going to watch **** telly instead of checking my planner to see if everything is covered, last minute lesson plans etc..
     
  6. thepd

    thepd New commenter

    Any job has its mundane bits. What's important is whether or not you're happy with that. I'm with peterpiper - after 14 years, I've decided teaching isn't what I want to do anymore, so I'm leaving too. Making that decision and acting on it has made me as excited as I was when I first began teaching and I am currently counting down the days!
     
  7. rouseau22

    rouseau22 New commenter

    Why was the 'NewCareer Directions' board scrapped? We used to have a place to go to ask and read questions related to this.
    Aside from that, isnt it the 64 million dollar question, what can do with a PGCE!
     
  8. thepd

    thepd New commenter

    I would say that if you have a PGCE, you also have a degree and, if you've ever been a teacher, a vast skills base to boot. I depends what you WANT to do, not just what you're qualified for.
     
  9. Well you'd think that you had a vast skills base, but unfortunately lots of employers don't tend to agree.
    I left teahing at the end of last year and never want to do it again. However i'm still unemployed and just keep getting rejection after rejection for whatever i applied for aa they are going for someone 'with skills more appropriate to the role.'
    I'm not applying to be a brain surgeon, i'm applying for administrative roles which i ahve done before and apparently unkown to the industry had to do as a teacher.
    Apologies for the rant I am just so frustrated!
     

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