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Advert trying to put me off wine

Discussion in 'Personal' started by mammal, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. I wish they would stop showing that advert where all sorts of nasty things could happen to women if they have 2 glasses of wine regularly. I qualify but I'm still enjoying a nice glass or two of rose as I write.
    My OH is out with mates and will probably have 4 or 5 pints. The nurse said he was a binge drinker because he doesn't usually drink the rest of the week. There doesn't seem to be an equivalent advert for men.
    Anyway cheers to all you fellow drinkers and lets hope our brains don't explode just yet.
     
  2. I wish they would stop showing that advert where all sorts of nasty things could happen to women if they have 2 glasses of wine regularly. I qualify but I'm still enjoying a nice glass or two of rose as I write.
    My OH is out with mates and will probably have 4 or 5 pints. The nurse said he was a binge drinker because he doesn't usually drink the rest of the week. There doesn't seem to be an equivalent advert for men.
    Anyway cheers to all you fellow drinkers and lets hope our brains don't explode just yet.
     
  3. jacob

    jacob Lead commenter

    Minesha double.
     
  4. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Oh, there is!
    No discrimination when it comes to making folk feel guilty. [​IMG]
    My parents in law are one step away from galloping dipsomania <u>and</u> they smoke like chimneys. Both still going strong in their 70s.
    Enjoy your wine, hen - I'm having a nice claret and I don't give a fiddler's ****. [​IMG]
     
  5. I am onto my third (LARGE) glass of California Red (Winemaker's Seal, Gallo, 2,99 from Netto - a real Goldst&uuml;ck of a wine for a cheap price, tis an insider secret).
    Stuff adverts and statistics.
    It is Friday, I am 42 and I can decide for my bleddy self what I drink and how much. I may even finish the bottle!
    Guilt? Pah!
    I am also smoking a cigarette (ok, need to work on that one again).
     
  6. You've persuaded me to have a third glass then. No smoking for me though - I gave up many years ago. The last one was on my hen night and I've been married over 30 years.
     
  7. They're in danger of turning me off the message. I spend far more time fretting about what I drink than is proportionate to the quantity. After all my recent tests I know it's doing me no harm, and being repeatedly told by an advertising campaign that I am a binge drinker who is heading for breast, mouth and bowel cancer, diabetes and liver-rot is starting to get on my wick. Which they would interpret as denial or a direct hit!
     
  8. EcoLady

    EcoLady New commenter

    It's all question of priorities.
    Monday - Had my PGCE primary interview at Cambridge
    Tuesday - Catching up on Monday's work in the office while maintaining a cover story for where I'd been on Monday
    Wednesday - Final prep for a conference that I hosted on ...
    Thursday - hugely important day, V high profile. Smiles all round
    Friday - Congratulations in the office because yesterday went really well, but the routine work has piled up. Then home to check Track to find that I have a Conditional Offer.
    So - who is more at risk? Me, or any person who dares to attempt to separate me from my wine tonight! ;-)
    Bottoms up!
     
  9. Your UK "we will tell you you will die if you do not eat raw carrots sticks and drink pure water" stuff is weird.
    I am truly shocked whenever I return home and EVERYWHERE there are signs warning me to do this, not do that, that I am on CCTV, traffic light bleddy symbols on food, how to feed your family for a fiver IF YOU BUY OUR PRODUCTS BUT WE WON'T TELL YOU HOW TO USE THE EXCESS YOU HAVE BOUGHT TO COOK THIS RECIPE, please do not walk on the grass or we will sue you, please do not use balls, please do not be loud or disturb your neighbours.
    And no ****** fanny takes a blind bit of notice. They do the complete opposite. Here we have no signs or telling what to do but we do what is on your signs without being told.
    Tis quite a cultural shock, I tell thee, to return to Blighty and wonder what happened after I left.
     
  10. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Now come on CQ, this is far less true of British parks than mainland continental ones.
    We are blessed with wonderful parks.
     
  11. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Congratulations EcoLady - slainte! [​IMG]
    *raises glass (on 2nd large one now)*
     
  12. I know of no park here where you are not allowed to walk on the grass. Our parks are our gardens where we sunbathe, bbq and play ball sports as we have no gardens.
    Or what kind of parks do you mean?
     
  13. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    French ones?
     
  14. ah, do you mean the formal ones?
    When I say park, I mean the German park (sorry) - these are communal areas, not show gardens or such.
    I agree though, if you mean formal gardens (I would call these parks gardens) that they can be spectacularly beautiful and should not be used for playing football or having a bbq.

     
  15. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Yes, the formal ones. The ones where you can't walk on the grass.
     
  16. NQT1986

    NQT1986 Occasional commenter

    I know-it's depressing, isn't it?! I wonder how many people *do* stick within those guidelines and either have just one glass of wine a few nights a week, or do most people have 2/3 glasses (shock horror-sometimes even 4) on a semi-regular basis.

    Does society drink far more than 20/30/50 years ago, I wonder?
     
  17. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    I think that one issue is that the size of a drink seems to have almost doubled in some cases.
    I recall Opa enjoying his nightly beer - a small dumpy bottle, possibly about 1/4 litre? And some nights he'd share it with Omi!
    And wine glasses are huge now compared to when I was young!


     
  18. My mother's generation (she was born in 1929) certainly didn't drink much. Neither my mother nor any of her female friends or relations drank at home - not quite posh enough for wine with dinner, even if they could have afforded, it, and it would have been the equivalent of &pound;20+ a bottle back then and only available through an off-licence wine merchant.
    A brandy for shock, or a medicinal whisky and hot lemon, plus a bottle of gin for guests (we must have had the same bottle for five years) was it. If they went out they had two gin and oranges or lager and limes, and I never saw them drunk with the sole exception of one NYE party where my mother discgraced herself by sitting on her brother-in-law's knee whilst they sang together; and the night the doctor finished my uncle off, when a restorative brandy turned into three 50 yr old women unused to alcohol sinking a whole bottle of Remy Martin between them.
    It was not considered the mark of a lady to lose control, and that was important to them.
     
  19. I agree Lily.
    However IME the generation before that (ie my grandparents) drank more. My nan had a regular delivery of 'Beer at Home Means Davenports'! And grandad went down the boozer every night for his 3-4 pints, and more at weekends. (I think I have inherited these genes)
     
  20. Oh yes. I was only referring to the women. My father's generation of working class men went to the pub after every shift and I don't remember a day when my father and adult male relations on that side of the family didn't drink drink four pints of bitter. And sometimes they'd go out again if there were e.g. a snooker tournament or quiz. That's a minimum 56 units a week but none of them was fat or yellow. Perhaps because they worked at physically demanding jobs and walked everywhere?
     

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