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Adapting Y1 History of Homes for life in China

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Waiguoren, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Hello all,
    I wonder if anyone has any good advice on how to solve a problem I'm having with planning (I'm on holiday at the moment for Chinese New Year, going back on the 14th). I work in an international school in China, with a mixture of Korean and foreign-born Chinese children with various degrees of ESL, Year 1 British curriculum, and I've decided to teach a 3-week history unit on homes. Now I've found lots of great resources online - planning samples, games, photos galore - and I'm sure I could teach a great unit on Victorian houses; but I'd like to do something to make it culturally relevant. These children live in China, and I'd like to teach them something about the history of Chinese homes. The problem is, I've got no knowledge of the history of Chinese homes, and no real resources!
    If anybody could give me any advice on what I could do I'd be very grateful. I was thinking of:
    - Concentrating on common elements; whether it's China or Britain, 100 years ago houses had no electricity, for example.
    - Taking a trip to the middle of the city - there are several areas we could go to. Perhaps the best is an area called five roads, which has many examples of old houses, many of them European (Tianjin had quite a colonial history).
    - Using the British resources as a basis, and then comparing them to their Asian/Chinese counterparts.
    - Asking parents and grandparents to talk / write in about what their homes were like when they were children.
    It might even be a good idea to teach the children a strictly British history of homes - give them some geographical and cultural, as well as historical, teaching.
    What do you think? Anybody got any ideas?
    Thanks very much in advance!


     
  2. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Hello all,
    I wonder if anyone has any good advice on how to solve a problem I'm having with planning (I'm on holiday at the moment for Chinese New Year, going back on the 14th). I work in an international school in China, with a mixture of Korean and foreign-born Chinese children with various degrees of ESL, Year 1 British curriculum, and I've decided to teach a 3-week history unit on homes. Now I've found lots of great resources online - planning samples, games, photos galore - and I'm sure I could teach a great unit on Victorian houses; but I'd like to do something to make it culturally relevant. These children live in China, and I'd like to teach them something about the history of Chinese homes. The problem is, I've got no knowledge of the history of Chinese homes, and no real resources!
    If anybody could give me any advice on what I could do I'd be very grateful. I was thinking of:
    - Concentrating on common elements; whether it's China or Britain, 100 years ago houses had no electricity, for example.
    - Taking a trip to the middle of the city - there are several areas we could go to. Perhaps the best is an area called five roads, which has many examples of old houses, many of them European (Tianjin had quite a colonial history).
    - Using the British resources as a basis, and then comparing them to their Asian/Chinese counterparts.
    - Asking parents and grandparents to talk / write in about what their homes were like when they were children.
    It might even be a good idea to teach the children a strictly British history of homes - give them some geographical and cultural, as well as historical, teaching.
    What do you think? Anybody got any ideas?
    Thanks very much in advance!


     
  3. Hi Rkohll,
    I am a Chinese student studying MA in Education in Brunel University in UK. After reading what you said, i think that is good idea to combine some points of British culture with Chinese counterpart. but for some similarity, it may be difficult to find out some resource in English. If you are able to read Chinese, there should be a lot of resource on internet. For one example that you mentioned---Chinese building, the style is totally different from western countries', with reference to the whole building's structure, arrangement for some purposes and certain meanings. Hope those ideas will help you. If you need more information, tell me. I will try best to help you. [​IMG]
    God bless you
    Olivia
     
  4. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Thank you very much for your advice and resources, Olivia! The webbsite looks most useful!
     

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