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Activities to encourage independent writing

Discussion in 'English' started by jo300, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. Hi I've not had my own class for 6 years (PPA cover) and have got yr 3 in Sept. I'm wanting to set up a writing table for children to go and do some independent writing and have experience of writing for various audiences.
    I know this will be covered in the Lit. lesson but I wanted the chn to have as much opportunity as possible to practise their writing.
    Does anyone know of any ideas or activities that the children could be doing without much teacher input if they've a 'spare' few mins!!??
    Thankyou

     
  2. Hi I've not had my own class for 6 years (PPA cover) and have got yr 3 in Sept. I'm wanting to set up a writing table for children to go and do some independent writing and have experience of writing for various audiences.
    I know this will be covered in the Lit. lesson but I wanted the chn to have as much opportunity as possible to practise their writing.
    Does anyone know of any ideas or activities that the children could be doing without much teacher input if they've a 'spare' few mins!!??
    Thankyou

     
  3. Basically you've got a nonsense national curriculum assignment. Children in year 3 don't have occasion to write for different audiences. They don't send business letters, they don't have a wide social correspondence, they don't publish novels or magazines or write scientific papers. Their skills are such that if work is spelt reasonably well, punctuated, and uses received grammar, it is good. They'll write in only three situations; formal schoolwork, letters to adult relatives, and messing about messages to pass to each other. They instinctively know the social conventions for these audiences and it is not necessary to teach them.
    Just get them to write imaginative stories, with the occasional factual assignment for the few who really dislike composing fiction.

     
  4. If you have a book table, get them to write reviews for their classmates on books they've read from the table. If you have an A4 card for each book, divided into smallish sections (one section per review, maybe 4 or 5 to a page), each review only needs to be a couple of sentences. You could have prompts, if you felt that would help.
     
  5. Thanku. I guess I didn't put my idea across too clearly, I'm literally bogged down with all of this!! I meant little tasks to get them writing- ie stories, letters, reviews etc just anything!!
    I didn't want to just say- 'write a story' I realise that for Yr3 I won't get reams and reams, I just want mini tasks!
     
  6. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    I don't teach primary but, as a parent, I borrowed an idea from my son's school to get him, a reluctant writer, to write more. We had a chat book that was by the dining room table. He would write a message to me and I would write one back. Like Facebook messages old style, I suppose. First thing he did when he got up or came in from school was check for a message! Maybe each child could have their own chat book?
    I know it's not different forms and audiences but I've no idea how you would do that for Year 3. I wouldn't expect less able Year 7s to write a review, blurb, account or whatever without at least a brief reminder of conventions.
     
  7. Excellent ideas thanku :) Even if its a couple of sentences, it gets them writing!!!

     
  8. http://english.edusites.co.uk/index.php/article/encouraging-independent-and-active-learning-and-thought

    This might inspire you - good luck!
     
  9. Cheers for that last link!
     
  10. Thats great, thanku

     

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