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Acting up

Discussion in 'Senior Leadership Team' started by SubordinateClaws, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Has anyone had experience of a DH not acting up in the event of a HT leaving? If so, could you share the reason and any fallout, if any.

    Obviously I'm asking due to my personal situation, I'm in a rather unusual position regarding acting up. I knew taking on the DH role that in the event of the HT being unable to fulfil her role I'd step in. She has though resigned, in unusual circumstances which would be identifying to share. When the job was offered the governing body knew of her leaving date,as has come to light through paperwork. My goodwill is a little low for other reasons too, effectively they knew I was being recruited as acting head in an area in crisis filling HT posts. In hindsight the interview tasks and questioning reflected this. I was not aware of this until the week after starting at the school. Speaking plainly I would not have taken the job had I known, though I was happy to act up in the event of illness or other need. I was honest in the interview in stating that I'd like to be a HT one day; now though isn't a great time in my personal life for the responsibilities of a small school and the demands it would place on my family life as childcare is already a push until my youngest starts school next September.

    Does anyone know what my position is regarding a potentially long term acting role? Is this beyond 'deputising' as there will be no HT in post?It is being treated as a given that I will step up.
     
  2. Has anyone had experience of a DH not acting up in the event of a HT leaving? If so, could you share the reason and any fallout, if any.

    Obviously I'm asking due to my personal situation, I'm in a rather unusual position regarding acting up. I knew taking on the DH role that in the event of the HT being unable to fulfil her role I'd step in. She has though resigned, in unusual circumstances which would be identifying to share. When the job was offered the governing body knew of her leaving date,as has come to light through paperwork. My goodwill is a little low for other reasons too, effectively they knew I was being recruited as acting head in an area in crisis filling HT posts. In hindsight the interview tasks and questioning reflected this. I was not aware of this until the week after starting at the school. Speaking plainly I would not have taken the job had I known, though I was happy to act up in the event of illness or other need. I was honest in the interview in stating that I'd like to be a HT one day; now though isn't a great time in my personal life for the responsibilities of a small school and the demands it would place on my family life as childcare is already a push until my youngest starts school next September.

    Does anyone know what my position is regarding a potentially long term acting role? Is this beyond 'deputising' as there will be no HT in post?It is being treated as a given that I will step up.
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I suggest you seek the advice of your union on this. It's always been my belief that anyone who takes on a deputy headship needs from day 1 to consider themselves ready to take on the acting headship and possibly for a considerable period of time - what if the head had not been planning to move on but had become seriously ill (or even died? It does happen)? You'd have been expected to pick up the headship immediately then.
    It's entirely wrong for someone to take a deputy headship and then complain they're not ready or willing to act up when required. That's my opinion.
     
  4. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I agree. The role of the deputy is to deputise. This is the only way it differs from assistant head. By applying for and accepting the role you have declared yourself ready to run the school in the head's absence however long that may be.
    I've known a few deputies who've found themselves in this position only a few weeks into their first deputy headship.
    The only person I've ever come across who didn't "step up" was 7 months pregnant- for the sake of stability the LA drafted in an acting head.
     
  5. I completely see your points, I've always held that view. I think the main point of my post was to have a (slightly wine-induced) moan about the situation. I am a little bitter, but I understand the responsibilities of my post and I also care very much about the school. I'm feeling a bit used if I'm honest and I have noone in real life I can really vent with. I can and will step up, as I could in the case of long term illness, I just don't want to ideally. Along with how the issue has been handled it'll take a while to build back up a positive relationship with the Governors, but I really need to assert myself about hearing news first and not second hand regarding the future of the HT post!
     
  6. Keighleigh

    Keighleigh New commenter

    Do what you feel is right for you. Some Deputies like to step up, others don't. I worked with a DHT who didn't want to step up, the governors got an Interim Head and when he went she applied and got the job. Other Deputies would jump at the chance!

    It's up to YOU!! Never mind what others think, do what you feel is right for you, in your circumstances, in your own timing.

    Wishing you the best of luck!!
     
  7. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I believe when you sign the contract attached to the job description with "to deputise in the absence of the head" you're committing yourself to that part of the role unless there are exceptional circumstances. There are parts of our job we don't enjoy. There are times when we all think "do I really have to?" but the answer is yes, if it's in your JD and you signed the contract. I'm sure you're trying to be supportive to the op, but they will find themselves in a difficult position contractually if they refuse.
     

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