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Accepted teaching post 2 months ago but circumstances have changed

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by jdl11, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. jdl11

    jdl11 New commenter

    Hello everyone,

    Was after a bit of advice, I have accepted a teaching post, signed a letter and all that stuff. Problem being my personal circumstances have changed/realised teaching is not really worth moving away from my partner/family for.

    I am aware I should be greatfull for this opportunity and I 90% sure I will go though with the post (from what I have heard I would be in deep doodoo if I backed out now)
    But after next year I know I will be leaving the post I have accepted (Without a shadow of a doubt) either to go travelling or move to London to be near my girllfriend.

    Just wondered if anyone could tell me is this a relevant reasons for leaving, im sure it is. Although what I have seen teachers seem to be the most pretentious bunch I have ever come across and everyone seems to think I need to stay somewhere to show commitment to a Job, but I will not stay somewhere that is not personally good for me, as much as I love teaching I work to live not live to work.

    I am graded as outstanding at the moment, and work hard to make good lessons. Anyone got any advice about how moving so early might impact upon my employability/career. Because if I am going to get stuck somewhere I would rather jump ship now then get stuck somewhere (I don't have any connection to) for the next year with no prospects there after. I will hand in my notice as early as possible after christmas as I dont want to mess the school around.

    Any views?
     
  2. jdl11

    jdl11 New commenter

    Hello everyone,

    Was after a bit of advice, I have accepted a teaching post, signed a letter and all that stuff. Problem being my personal circumstances have changed/realised teaching is not really worth moving away from my partner/family for.

    I am aware I should be greatfull for this opportunity and I 90% sure I will go though with the post (from what I have heard I would be in deep doodoo if I backed out now)
    But after next year I know I will be leaving the post I have accepted (Without a shadow of a doubt) either to go travelling or move to London to be near my girllfriend.

    Just wondered if anyone could tell me is this a relevant reasons for leaving, im sure it is. Although what I have seen teachers seem to be the most pretentious bunch I have ever come across and everyone seems to think I need to stay somewhere to show commitment to a Job, but I will not stay somewhere that is not personally good for me, as much as I love teaching I work to live not live to work.

    I am graded as outstanding at the moment, and work hard to make good lessons. Anyone got any advice about how moving so early might impact upon my employability/career. Because if I am going to get stuck somewhere I would rather jump ship now then get stuck somewhere (I don't have any connection to) for the next year with no prospects there after. I will hand in my notice as early as possible after christmas as I dont want to mess the school around.

    Any views?
     
  3. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    Suggest you read this thread.
    https://community.tes.co.uk/forums/p/569066/7406289.aspx#7406289
    A contract of employment is in place and the school have a legal right of redress if you breach the contract. With the shortage of induction posts you should consider completing the induction year which would give you better future options for working in teaching.
     
  4. From what I understand you wish to leave AFTER your induction year (please correct me if I am wrong).
    This is not a problem, you can resign from your contract without giving a reason when your induction year is complete, as can any teacher wishing to leave their job, you still need to make sure you do a good job though for refererences. It would be a problem if you withdraw before actually taking up employment.
    Think carefully about giving up any job for a relationship. Different if you are married and/or have a family etc but it sounds like you aren't at the moment, other jobs are difficult to come by particularly if you were to leave after such a short time.
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    To be honest these sorts of views so readily expressed to teachers are more likely to harm your career prospects than how long or not you stay in a post.

    If your circumstances have genuinely changed, and you haven't just changed your mind, then write a very polite email or letter to the headteacher and explain and apologise and withdraw. We recently appointed someone for September who has done just that.

    Leaving after a year is not all that unusual. It won't matter a bit.
     
  6. jdl11

    jdl11 New commenter

    Sorry, I don't mean to sound negative about teachers, but as a profession it is a little odd in my view, Compared to some of the professions my friends are in where people leave after a short amount of time without batting an eyelid.

    If I did leave/move at the end of next year I know it would not look bad providing I had a good reasons and I stuck with my next post for a decent amount of time.

    I just feel guilty about going into a postion if I know I am only going to be there a year, doesn't really seem fair on the pupils or the department. Its silly really, I am very lucky, I only have to move 45 mins from where I live now to do the job. I am lucky as an NQT, more so in a subject such as Geography.

    I just feel abit overwhelmed at the moment, I am 22 and have kained it right though from school to now, just feel like I need a break now to gain a bit of perspective and gain some insight into the world. I am only here this year because of the tuition fee hike, I would have taken a year ou this year but a lot of the teachers in my school said getting the NQT year done would be much better for me to so.
     
  7. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    The system we have is mainly determined by set resignation dates and the need to funnel recruitment activities into a short period of time. Other professions have similar arrangements and agreements.Leaving after a year is not a problem and if you really should count yourself lucky to land a job by this stage- you can now focus on completing course and preparing for the job ahead.
     
  8. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Don't worry about it. No one else will.
    One of the things that shocked us as parents was the discovery that teachers are here one minute, gone the next - when we were at school, teachers were in post until retirement with almost no one ever leaving (except the occasional student teacher who we all knew would just be there for a term or so).
    Now it seems it's normal for teachers to vanish at half term and for our kids to have "general teachers" (i.e. cover supervisors) for a half term while waiting for the next NQT to turn up.
    Apparently it's what's called "progress".

     
  9. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    I can only think of professional football. Are there any other "professions" where things operate anything like teaching?
    I've certainly not heard of it anywhere else (it's not even always adhered to in the private education sector).
     
  10. They are probably not in vocational roles. As a teacher I have never been in post more than three years and spent my NQT year on supply as three different schools. This has never stopped me getting work or promotion. The longer you are at a school the more you know the students and it lovely taking them through a whole GCSE or A-level course - that said a year then a change is unlikely to impact on them it is the 13 supply teachers in a year that does damage. I think taking a break after a year is a good idea. I left a full-time post in 2009 to do a full-time masters, still taught a little bit got a scholarship to go and work on a neolithic site in Israel now back home and back in school. It has energised me and put the mojo back into my teaching. I also knew a science teacher who took every third year to go off mountain climbing and was then back in school. Teaching is a large and diverse profession and it really does take all sorts... One of the lads I did induction with left after three years to work for Railtrack as he couldn't see himself teaching for the rest of his life, didn't do his career any harm having teaching at the base. Good luck and don't worry about it so much.
     

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