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Ability grouping???

Discussion in 'Primary' started by rainbowdrop86, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. rainbowdrop86

    rainbowdrop86 New commenter

    At my school, our head is very against ability grouping and insists children sit on mixed ability tables. I kinda agree, and as such, have organised my children into 6 mixed ability tables. However, i help me with planning and differentiation, i still like to have some sort of ability groups, they just dont sit in them. For example ill just say circles do this, squares do that. Im planning on doing this for lit and maths, but am wondering how many groups to have? Im thinking just 3. to be honest i dont want many more for my own sanity, and for the childrens!!! Is 3 enough, high middle low, etc?
     
  2. rainbowdrop86

    rainbowdrop86 New commenter

    At my school, our head is very against ability grouping and insists children sit on mixed ability tables. I kinda agree, and as such, have organised my children into 6 mixed ability tables. However, i help me with planning and differentiation, i still like to have some sort of ability groups, they just dont sit in them. For example ill just say circles do this, squares do that. Im planning on doing this for lit and maths, but am wondering how many groups to have? Im thinking just 3. to be honest i dont want many more for my own sanity, and for the childrens!!! Is 3 enough, high middle low, etc?
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    In the past (year 5/6) I generally have 5 groups, but often more than one will be working on the same activity. So it could be that the top two groups are doing one thing, then a middle group on another and then bottom two on a third. Or it could be that the top have one thing, then the next two another and the bottom two a third. Does that make sense?

    Occasionally 5 different things go on, but not often. Occasionally the SEN children do something different as well. Just be flexible.

    I would have more groups, so you can swap back and forth as you wish with activities.
     
  4. Depends on the spread of ability in your class. I've gone with 5 groups in the past but that can make your head spin a bit. Will probably have 4 this year but I'm in Year 1 where the spread of ability isn't as wide as it will be in a Year 6 class. I'm still thinking it over at the moment.
    I'd look at your class and their current levels - then try splitting them - will they split into 3 groups without too big a spread of ability in each? When I taught Year 5 I had a range from Level 1s to high Level 4s and everything in between - I had to put them in 5 groups really.
     
  5. I usually have 4
    ! is SEN
    1 is LA/MA/HA
    I move the chn though from group to group as a MA child might be exceptionally good at, fo example, shape and so might do HA activity that lesson. Similarly, they may not be able to grasp long multiplication and so work with LA that lesson. The group members are flexible but the normal variety of activities is 4 plus extension/support work.
    For literacy I have the same number of activities but no "groups" - I just give the chn the work for that lesson and work with them as necessary sometimes moving them to be together, sometimes working 1:1 depending on the task. I don't believe in sitting chn in ability groups in Literacy.
     

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