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A word mind mapping game - yes, I am abusing you again.

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by anon3372, May 6, 2011.

  1. Looking at cognates and false friends, so for those around who speak other lingos, and I know there are quite a few here, can you post as many words as you know for the following?
    egg
    milk
    bread
    temperature
    meat
    pork
    lamb
    chicken
    beef
    (yes, those ones are very interesting, as most languages just refer to the animal)
    soup
    fish
    stew
    casserole
    roast
    meal
    breakfast
    lunch
    dinner
    supper
    snack (snigger)
    cook
    kitchen
    recipe
    Ta muchly in advance. I shall explain when I have the wordies!
     
  2. FrauSue

    FrauSue New commenter

    Do you want regional variations too - like different kinds of bread (rolls, baps, barms, hogies, subs ...) or just straight translations of the words? I always think food vocab is fascinating. I got quite confused in Austria by Erdäpfel, Paradeisen, Melanzane, Eidotter, Zwetschken, Topfen and the like as the words were so different from the German versions.
     
  3. Regional variations are good too.
     
  4. landaise

    landaise Occasional commenter

    stew (noun) is un ragoût
    In northern France they use souper to mean the evening meal (used as a verb, too)
    casser la croûte is frequently used to mean eat, quite simply
    un en cas is often used for a snack, as is un grignotage.
    Sadly, le snacking is also starting to be used as well...
     
  5. landaise

    landaise Occasional commenter

    une casserole=a pan (general term)
    The idea of a casserole (recipient) is given by une cocotte, une marmite
    The meal ' a casserole' can be expressed by several different terms: une daube, une marmite de... une mitonée, une mijotée, une cocotte, une garbure (depending on the actual dish and the region: daube is very provençal, garbure is SW France)
     
  6. Thank you, you lovely lot!
    tee hee, that made me smile.
     
  7. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Do you want me to set this as an exercise with my Elementary class? I have Arabic, French, German, Korean, Spanish and Turkish speakers?
     
  8. You can certainly have a go and we can compare!
    My group are all A1/A2 level, so I have been keeping most of it still very basic. This is, however, why I chose the vocab group "food" as most will still know some foreign words in several languages for food, particulary as we are so multi-culti here and the discussion about meat (vs. animal) is always an interesting one.
    Strangely, we somehow went off on to a tangent and were speaking of forwarding agents (we had wandered off on to logistics) and were then working on the stress of the word (i.e. on the for, not the ward) and the weakest guy in the group (linguistically) had one of those lovely eureka moments and burst out with "FORward - from football! The man (pah!) scores the goals and runs FORward and is called a FORward". I think that is the longest sentence he has ever managed in English!
    Fair brought a wee lump to my throat - I love those kind of moments when they realise they know more than they think they know. This guy is 50 and convinced he hasn't a clue about English (he knows LOADS of words though - his grammar is his weak point).

     
  9. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    The change came when William the Conqueror became king. The court spoke French and so the names for the meats were the French words.
    Sheep meat was more common than lamb so we had Mouton, which became mutton, Cowmeat or Bouef, becoming beef, young cow became Veal from Veau, Pigmeat was Porc, now Pork, chicken did not change.
     
  10. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Another funny, A German boy told me: "My mother is a very good cooker."
    So I drew a picture of one on the board!!
     
  11. Yes, but this is where it becomes fascnitating.
    French for cow is la vache.
    For a sheep le mouton (do they have an extra word for lamb? I can't remember).
    Pig is le cochon.
    etc.
    The words for the animal are different, in general, to the words for the meat.
    In German, for example, they are not. We have Rind, Lamm, Schwein, Hirsch, Kalb, etc.

     
  12.  
  13. ooops, cut off my post.
    I have posted this before, years back. I once had a wee boy in class, when we were going on about culture and stuff and he piped up
    "Hitler - that was the guy who got the arrow through the eye wasn't it and there is this big tapestry about it in France?"
     
  14. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    I know the Arabic word for meat is Lahm, or Lahem, it's in the name of Bethlehem, House of meat!!
     
  15. Lahmacun - another related word then.
     
  16. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    The German for 'mutton' is not the same as the German for 'sheep'....but it's one of very few exceptions!


    And a couple of smiles...

    We had a German lad visit us, and he came into the kitchen and asked if it was possible for Mum to <u>cook</u> his socks! (He had cotton football socks and wanted them done on a 'boil' wash)
    And an English Girl got a little confused when she wanted to know what time we were having supper, and asked in German what time we would be celebrating Holy Communion! (She couldn't think of the term for 'Supper' - Abendbrot - so decided on asking for the evening meal...she knew evening was Abend and meal was Mahl.....)
    (In both cases I held back on the smiles until alone, although I gave a better translation.....I appreciate the fact that they both made valiant efforts to speak in a foreign language - if we don't make mistakes we don't learn!)
     
  17. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Egg



    Hindi: undah


    Irish: ubh (pronounced &ldquo;uv&rdquo;)





    milk


    Hindi: dudh (like the word &ldquo;dude&rdquo; but soft d at the end)


    Irish: bainne (bah-nya)


    Bread


    Hindi: roti (row-tee)


    Irish: ar&aacute;n
    (ah-rawn)


    Meat


    Hindi: gosht (rhymes with ghost)


    Irish: feol (fyowl)


    temperature


    Hindi: bukhar = fever, I don&rsquo;t know about food temerpature


    Irish: ???


    pork


    Hindi: sewer-ka-gosht


    Irish: muiceoil
    (muh-wee-cyol)



    Lamb


    Hindi: bear-ka-gosht or perhaps bear-ka-bacha-ka-gosht


    Irish: uaineoil (ooan-yohl)

    from an Irish friend who knows some Hindi.
     
  18. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    More of the same

    chicken


    Hindi: murgh


    Irish: sic&iacute;n (shicken)


    Beef


    Hindi: bell-ka-gosht


    Irish: mairteoil


    soup


    Irish:


    Fish


    Hindi: machlii


    Irish: iasc (ee-asc, the c is prounounced in a way that
    has no English equivilant)



    stew


    Irish: stobhach (sto-vach)


    Casserole



    roast ?


    Meal


    Hindi: Khanna (this is the noun for food and also the verb to eat)


    Irish: b&eacute;ile


    breakfast


    naashta


    Irish:



    Lunch


    Irish: l&oacute;n (sounds like
    loan)


    dinner


    Irish:



    Supper


    Irish: suip&eacute;ar



    snack


    Hindi: naashta


    Irish:


    Cook


    Hindi: khanna banana (lit= make food)


    Irish: c&oacute;car&aacute;il
    (cookuhrail)


    kitchen


    Irish: cistin
    (kish-tin)


    recipe


    Irish: oideas (owee-jass)
    I love the Hindi word for cook, 'khanna banana'!
     
  19. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Arabic, from a Lebanese friend who teaches in Saudi.



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    Egg: baid milk: haleeb
    Bread: khoboz temperature: harara
    Meat: laham pork: laham khanzeer
    Lamb: kharoof chicken: dajaj
    Beef: laham bakar soup: shorba
    Fish: samak stew: yaslok
    Casserole: casserole roast: yashwee
    Meal: wajbah breakfast: fotoor
    Lunch: ghada dinner: asha
    Supper: asha snack: wajbah khafeefa
    Cook: yatbokh kitchen: matbakh
    Recipe: wasfah
     
  20. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    And I used the text box but all that came out!!
     

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