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A troubled child...

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by lucy1986, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. I have a child in my class that does not care about any consequences.

    He usually responds well to praise- however in the last week he has displayed difficult behaviour constantly. Always
    wants my attention and its draining.

    He does not care if you talk to his parents. (They are supportive and struggling at home!)

    He does not care if he misses playtime.

    He does not care if he has to go to the head teachers office.

    Nothing phases him.

    If I start giving him individual rewards other 'difficult' children in the class would want it too.

    Please help...

    Lucy
     
  2. I have a child in my class that does not care about any consequences.

    He usually responds well to praise- however in the last week he has displayed difficult behaviour constantly. Always
    wants my attention and its draining.

    He does not care if you talk to his parents. (They are supportive and struggling at home!)

    He does not care if he misses playtime.

    He does not care if he has to go to the head teachers office.

    Nothing phases him.

    If I start giving him individual rewards other 'difficult' children in the class would want it too.

    Please help...

    Lucy
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    The key thing here is to continue. Unless he's a psychopath, and utterly ambivalent to the feelings of others, he does care what happens to him. But he uses his status as naughty kid to get attention. Deep down I bet he would prefer to be liked and valued by others, even if he doesn't know it.
    So persist. Every time he disrupts the class to an unreasonable extent, have him removed quietly and with little fuss to another prepared place. Let him know participation with other is conditional to good behaviour. Praise him whenever he does something genuinely good, not merely unbad, and let that be the reward.
    It's a process of attrition; and you need to be more resilient than he. At such a young age, it;s vital that he learns to be socialised into the classroom before the orbit of his education starts to decay irrevocably.He may only get attention when he's naughty, so break that cycle. Don;t blow a gasket at him, just look disappointed and speak less to him. Speak more to him when he's good.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom
    here
    on his blog, or
    follow
    him. His latest book,Teacher,
    is out now, published by Continuum/ Bloomsbury

     

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