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A quick grammar lesson. :)

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by Middlemarch, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. This one really gets me, too. "Miss, can I lend a pencil?" "Certainly, who are you wanting to lend it to?"

    Another one I get (but I think it's a Northern Irish thing) is "Miss, you never learned us that."
     
  2. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Er . . . thanks for these posts, but we are looking here rather for common grammar mistakes made in writing in applications for teaching posts, rather than the pupils' contribution to us pulling our hair out!
    So, back to business . . .
    Use of Hyphens
    When a compound functions as an adjective before a noun, it is usual to write it with a hyphen even though it would not take hyphens elsewhere.
    • An up-to-date report. The records are not up to date.
    • A well-known fact. The facts are well known.
    • A common-sense approach to studying. She lacks common sense.
    • The twentieth-century artist Hockney. In the twentieth century.
    • A late-nineteenth-century novel. Novels of the late twentieth century.
    I have developed a whole-school procedure. The whole school has participated in this initiative.
    I monitor in-school variation of attainment on a half-termly basis.
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  3. This is because we often say should've, would've, could've etc instead of should have, would have, or could have and mistake the abbreviation for 'of'
    I should have warned him, We might have done it. He could have arrived earlier. They would have done it, if they had known.
    but we generally say:
    I should've warned him, We might've done it. He could've arrived earlier. They would've done it, if they had known.
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    BUMP!
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com<font size="2" color="#0000ff"> </font>
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Start reading at the beginning, folks . . .
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice @ tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
     
  6. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    The posts at the beginning are worth reading, folks, so work your way from the front.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
    I shall be contributing to the Moving into SLT seminar on 5th May.
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Start at the beginning . . .
    Best wishes
    ________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
    I shall be contributing to the Moving into SLT or Headship seminar on Saturday 19 May.
     
  8. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Yes, start at the beginning . . .
    It is so easy to make a daft mistake and spoil your chances of that Dream Job.
    Best wishes

    ___________________________________________________

    Meet Theo on line on the TES JobSeekers Forum, every week in print in the TES magazine, or in person at one of the TES Careers Advice Service seminars or individual consultations
     
  9. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

  10. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Start reading from the beginning, folks!

    Best wishes .
    ___________________________________________________
    Meet Theo on line on the TES JobSeekers Forum, every week in print in the TES magazine, or in person at one of the TES Careers Advice Service seminars or individual consultations
    I shall be doing the Moving into SLT seminar on 23 March. See you there!

     
  11. This is a very helpful thread, thank you. I used to make the sat/stood mistake and not once in my lifetime did anyone correct me. Maybe because it's a Northern thing? Everyone I know makes that mistake.
     
  12. I've got one!
    Common Error number 11
    Confusing than and then.
    <u>Than</u> is used for comparison. <u>Then</u> pertains to time or sequence.
     
  13. I cannot help but reflect, that if more people had been taught how to translate from English into another language they would have a greater understanding of how English is put together. This more analytical approach would eliminate most of these errors at a stroke.
     
  14. Agreed. This is exactly what my A-Level German Teacher said to me and I find myself doing this a lot, not just when switching from my native English to German and vice versa but also when working in the other languages that I speak (French and Spanish at basic level). Of course, I sometimes have the slight problem of my mind going blank after doing this (as it decides which language rules to use and when), but it makes life interesting :)
     
  15. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Time to remind yourselves again . . .

    Best wishes



    ___________________________________________________


    Meet Theo on line on the TES JobSeekers Forum, every week in print in
    the TES magazine, or in person at one of the TES Careers Advice Service
    seminars or individual consultations


    Moving into SLT
    seminar on 23 March. See you there!
    www.tesweekendworkshop176.eventbrite.co.uk


     
  16. Thanks for this Theo. I am an NQT with a Non-Verbal Learning Difficulty, and as such grammar is my major downfall. Applying for jobs is very time consuming and stressful as I'm very aware of how likely I am to make spelling and grammar mistakes and how bad these look on forms.

     
  17. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    BUMPBest wishes.
    ___________________________________________________

    Meet Theo on line on the TES JobSeekers Forum, or in person at one of the TES Careers Advice Service
    seminars or individual consultations
     
  18. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    <h1>NEW!</h1>
    I have started writing Blogs - have a look, click on the BLOGS at the top.

    If a Blog is helpful, then Red-Heart it by clicking on the black heart at the end.




    Best wishes

    ___________________________________________________

    Meet Theo on line on the TES JobSeekers Forum, or in person at one of the TES Careers Advice Service seminars or individual consultations
     
  19. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

  20. I work/have worked with adults who make the following errors:

    'are' for 'our' (pet hate of mine, I always correct it when I see children using it)

    'May you put the whiteboards away, please.' Yes, seriously. Lovely bloke, but grammatically challenged.

    And, of course, all of the howlers described above!
     

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