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A quick grammar lesson. :)

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by Middlemarch, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

  2. les25paul

    les25paul Star commenter

    Thanks for that, errors 1 and 3 are two I often get confused about (is being a science specialist a good enough excuse?)
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    No!
    Well, you did ask . . . [​IMG]
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    You've written that as if it surprised you.
    In fact, it's a very comon error across the TES boards (though not to be pointed out, because suggesting a fully qualified teacher cannot write grammatically correct English often offends) - as are all the errors described here by Theo.
     
  5. Correct these errors all the time in student essays...to the point where I begin to think I'm in the wrong!
     
  6. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I admit, when writing some psots, and especially with Job applications, I've done a couple of 'is that right?' type queries myself, especially with it's /its !
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    That's why we need to keep reminding ourselves . . .
    ______________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  8. Now, what about spelling mistakes: definite, receive!
     
  9. And practise and advise are verbs while practice and advice are nouns.
     
  10. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Let's keep these points at the front of our minds, folks!
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  11. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    Bloody English. Spent all last week with a Year 5 class explaining apostrophes are possessive or replace missing letters. Then struggled to explain why "its" as a possessive does not have an apostrophe! The use of apostrophes for plurals is my biggest bugbear. And SO MANY people suddenly think it's acceptable if the noun is capitalised, e.g. NQT's, FAQ's. GRRRRRR!!
    I am the first to hold my hands up and say "my spelling isn't great". I will happily check spellings of words in a dictionary in front of a class if necessary. I would never send a job app off with spelling errors; spell check was invented for a reason (though it won't help with any of the grammatical errors listed above!) I regularly post on here with errors though, as there is no spell checker on my browser. Or if there is, I don't know how to use it.
    Advise/advice I am just about clear on (thanks Theo!), practice/practise and stationary/stationery still bemuse me though.
     
  12. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    There's an e for envelope in stationery (as in writing paper and envelopes!)
     
  13. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Let's add a few more to keep this thread very much alive.
    Common error number 7: mixing up who's and whose
    "Who's" is an abbreviation, meaning either who is or who was or who has.
    "Whose" is the possessive.
    Who's that over there? It's the man whose wife has just won the prize. The one who's got the first prize? Yes, that's her.
    :) I have some more little tips for next week too.
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  14. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Now, that one drives me insane.
    I'm also faintly bemused by the inconsistency in some people's inappropriate use of the apostrophe. Near me is a cafe that lists the following on a board outside:
    pizza's
    pie's
    sandwich's
    chips.
    WHY haven't they realised?
    On a brighter note, the professionally produced road sign that used to point to a Catholic secondary school in my borough - Our Ladys School (making me want desperately to sneak up one night with a pot of black paint and add the missing apostrophe) - has now been remedied.
    They changed the name entirely and took down the sign.
     
  15. I'd like to add a common error of my own which is a PET HATE of mine!
    Common error number 8: Confusing verbs and the tenses.
    Why do so many people (especially those who live in SE England) insist on using the present instead of the past tense?
    E.g. I SAW Theogriff and Middlemarch yesterday NOT I SEE or SEES!
    I CAME to England 3 days ago NOT I COME to England 3 days ago.
    Yes miss, I DID or HAVE DONE my homework NOT I DONE my homework (I automatically correct my 10 year old and 8 year old nephews when they make this error, as it's just SLOPPY grammar, in my opinion).
    I LENT my CD to Theogriff NOT I BORROWED.
    I BORROWED Theogriff's CD yesterday not I LENT.
    Also, Yous is not a word! You is singular and plural!
    As for the you and I error, I agree that it's annoying, although even I have to think about it sometimes! The way I remember what to do is to apply the grammatical principle that I learned when I studied A-level German:
    Who is doing what? Is there a preposition?
    E.g. Me and my friend went to Spain is wrong because who is doing the 'going'? 'Me' and 'my friend'. Is there a preposition affecting the verb? No. So, the verb here is nomative and me is accusative, so 'me' has to become I. My friend and I went to Spain.
    Now, for the following sentence:
    So, it's goodnight from him and good night from me.
    Me is correct because 'goodnight' is 'performing the action' It is Goodnight. Who is 'doing' the being? Goodnight not me or him. Is there a preposition? Yes from. So I and he has to become me and him because of the position of the verb and the preposition 'from'.
    Another grammatical error that I didn't know about until my A-level German teacher pointed it out was in the use of the conditional tense:
    If I was you... NO! It's if I WERE you... because you are not me but you're talking from the position of what you MIGHT do if you were.

     
  16. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Thought it was a subjunctive in English . . .
    :)
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  17. Yeh man, tis the way of ritin tings innit???
    Kids nowadays. [​IMG]
     
  18. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I recently read 'Thank you for the days' by the radio broadcaster Mark Radcliffe. I would not have ranted aloud each time he made a 'you and I' error were it not for the fact that at one point in the book he shows off massively about how literate he was from a very early age.
    It made me want to seek him out and punch him in the face for each of these errors - my goodness, he'd be black and blue.
     
  19. It is. The Germans call it the 2nd conditional/Konjunktive. The 1st conditional or konjunktive eins is what we call indirect speech (The Germans can get rid of the word that when quoting people and use a different form of the present tense instead. We just keep using the present tense. Thank God!).

    I should have made that clearer in my post. Sorry about that!
     
  20. I recognise every single one of the grammatical mistakes you have mentioned from a Year 10 homework I just marked. However, I was nearly ready to let those mistakes slide when I read this particular one: "Saul had 2 run a way cos their was guys after him and he was like "OMG!"

    - Seriously?
     

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