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A Question for TA and LSA

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by Cosmic_Rainbow, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Cosmic_Rainbow

    Cosmic_Rainbow New commenter

    Hi
    I am a PGCE student and have just taken over several classes in which i will have a member of support staff with me. I was just wondering how i can make best use of this support in my classroom as atm all my suppprt does is hand out glue and worksheets. My mentor has suggested that i print copies of the slides for my assistant to have. anything else i can do to help my assistant and make better use of the support?
     
  2. Cosmic_Rainbow

    Cosmic_Rainbow New commenter

    Hi
    I am a PGCE student and have just taken over several classes in which i will have a member of support staff with me. I was just wondering how i can make best use of this support in my classroom as atm all my suppprt does is hand out glue and worksheets. My mentor has suggested that i print copies of the slides for my assistant to have. anything else i can do to help my assistant and make better use of the support?
     
  3. chocolateworshipper

    chocolateworshipper Occasional commenter

    You are going to be a fabulous teacher! (I mean that sincerely - I think it is fabulous that you are asking us for suggestions). I think it does vary slightly by age group, but your support should certainly be doing more than handing out glue and worksheets! I really don't know anything about KS1, but if you are KS1, you could certainly get him/her to listen to children read, sit next to low ability children during the input and check their understanding, support them during the task. Also, to help manage behaviour during the lesson. I work in KS2 , and I run intervention groups for maths, writing, phonics and reading. I look at their targets and put together a plan of how to support them in attaining those targets. The interventions are run during early work and during the start or end of some lessons. During the lesson, I do a focus group with the low ability group. If you want your TA to do this, I do strongly suggest giving him/her a copy of the lesson plan so they can see what the objective is etc. I also record spelling test results, log assessment results and 0/1 grids. I help out with displays. If parents evening is coming up, I will work out a timetable, write out the reply slips for parents, and type up the timetable for the teacher. I hope this gives you some ideas. Feel free to post any ideas for things you would like your TA to do - and we can let you know what we think!
     
  4. hubcap

    hubcap New commenter

    I am an LSA. I sit with the SEN children in class assisting with their learning and take them out for intervention groups in Numeracy and Literacy. I also have a spelling, reading and handwriting group. I feed back results to the teachers.
    I presume she is in the room with you all the time. Therefore I would suggest putting her with any struggling children, get her involved in your lesson by asking her opinion occasionally, if any pupils finish their work early you could ask her to listen to them read, practice handwriting, times tables, spellings. Ask her if theres is anything she has a special interest in, for example she may like to read stories to the children or make displays. Our TA is in charge of home reading books. It is nice to have a lesson plan, but our teachers just dont get the time, so that ones up to you. Always remember to thank her at the end of the day. Hope that helps!
     
  5. As well as the good suggestions above, maybe you could speak to the SENCO at the school about interventions that the TA could be involved in. I'm attached to one class but run intervention groups for children from several classes in the school. Thanks for asking :) Also, re lesson plans, the teacher I work with prints me a copy of the maths and literacy plans for the week and puts them in my drawer.
     
  6. Cosmic_Rainbow

    Cosmic_Rainbow New commenter

    Hey thanks for the replies. Sorry i forgot to say i am teaching science at ks3 and 4.
     
  7. glenn_xp

    glenn_xp New commenter

    The TA should be supporting the SEN students as well as keeping an eye out for other students that need help understanding or completing the task at hand.
     
  8. I'm a TA based in a Secondary School Science department.
    I focus on SEN pupils mainly, but never turn away any pupil who asks for help. Lesson plans for sure especially if you are doing experiments! Perhaps talk to the TA to tell him/ her what the lesson is about if it's a theory based lesson to give them a bit more understanding.
    I make sure that instructions are simplified, key concepts are simplified as best they can, pupils follow the method during practicals, and act as an extra set of ears and eyes for Health and Safety.
    Recording accurate results and graphs are also areas where puplis will need extra support (in my experience)
    Hope this helps?
     
  9. Hi,
    I work in a secondary school as a TA in the Science department. The last post gave good advice. The only thing I would add is that sometimes you need to work with those with special/additional needs and you could ask the TA to work with another group or supervise/ float around the class (with you in the room) whilst you work with them. Otherwise these pupils do get much direct input from the teacher and stop asking you questions and ask the TAs instead who may not have the specific subject knowledge that you have. Ask your TAs what experience they have ...you may be surprised lots in our school are graduates (Biology for me!). A quick word at the start of the lesson setting what you would like them to do is always helpful.
    I also support 6th form pupils in class and in 1:1 sessions.


     
  10. hi i am a TA in a ks2 class. my roles do include sticking things in or on books but this is not done in teaching time. i support chn at the start on teaching, monitering behaviour etc then i assist the lower ability chn in their learning, or i teaching them in an area that they are weak in. the teachre and myself have daily conversations regarding the lesson and or chn and my knowledge is welcomed. a good idea is to give your TA the planning or big picture at the star of the week or after PPA. this way if the TA is unsure of anything she can ask you or go off and prepare herself.
    hope that helps.
     
  11. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    I'm a TA in secondary. We work for the Learning Support Department. Our job is to support one or more pupils in the lessons as opposed to supporting the teacher. In my school we are not assigned to departments. Although some specialise in one area we all have the opportunity to work in all departments.
    I would love some information in advance of the lessons from the teachers to give me an idea of the topic. This would be particularly useful when kids ask me to explain what the teacher has said as they haven't understood. Quite often my answer is, "I don't know but could it be....? Let's think about what makes sense" or something like that.
    Can I please ask that you don't do what some teachers do? Please don't treat the TAs as if we are stupid or inferior. It doesn't happen often but it does happen.
    Have you been made aware of the kids in your classes who need support? You could always speak with the TAs about these kids to find out what support they get.
     

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