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A PGCE student swore and threw a dictionary at a student!

Discussion in 'English' started by hodreadergirl, Feb 12, 2007.

  1. This has literally just happened, I am still in shock, even after filling out all the paperwork regarding the situation. The student is "cocky" and rubbed the PGCE student up the wrong way, and had the class being exceedingly loud while I ran to do some photocopying for the PGCE student. The LSA in the room said that the PGCE student shouted at the kids to "shut the hell up" then threw the dictionary at the boy who had told her "calm down love- its on an english lesson."

    I have dismissed the PGCE student and her tutor is coming in tomorrow morning with her to discuss the problem. I think I may have just ruined her life!

    Was I right to do this? If she can snap so quickly, she shouln't be around kids.

    The LSA said she didn't even ask the students to be quiet in a calm and normal voice. Another teacher walked in when she heard the class scream when the dictionary hit the student and then things have unfolded from there. What would you have done?
     
  2. This has literally just happened, I am still in shock, even after filling out all the paperwork regarding the situation. The student is "cocky" and rubbed the PGCE student up the wrong way, and had the class being exceedingly loud while I ran to do some photocopying for the PGCE student. The LSA in the room said that the PGCE student shouted at the kids to "shut the hell up" then threw the dictionary at the boy who had told her "calm down love- its on an english lesson."

    I have dismissed the PGCE student and her tutor is coming in tomorrow morning with her to discuss the problem. I think I may have just ruined her life!

    Was I right to do this? If she can snap so quickly, she shouln't be around kids.

    The LSA said she didn't even ask the students to be quiet in a calm and normal voice. Another teacher walked in when she heard the class scream when the dictionary hit the student and then things have unfolded from there. What would you have done?
     
  3. You did exactly the right thing. You haven't ruined the student's life but have probably saved a lot of kids from being damaged by someone so unsuited to teaching. If only all the dangerous and unsuitable ones were weeded out in TP.
     
  4. You shouldn't have left the room to do anything, especially photocopying for the student!

    Had she not prepared properly for the lesson?

    Had you not checked she had the proper resources before she was taking the class?

    Why didn't the LSA do the photocopying if so desperate? Would the pupil have still acted in the same manner if you had been in the room?

    Don't worry about the student though. Everyone makes mistakes and she'll no doubt learn more from this experience than if she's have had an excellent lesson.

    She'll be a better teacher as a result of this and certainly doesn't need to be told she is unsuitable for teaching. After all, if you cant make mistakes with what seems like a dodgy class when you are a student, when can you?
     
  5. Throwing things at kids is not a mistake. It's evidence of an unstable personality. A PGCE student should be able to be left with a class. How else will they learn? it is not HOD's fault.
     
  6. We dont know the circumstances. The pupil could have been passed the dictionary or aggressively thrown the dictionary. Whatever circumstances, students who show signs of an unstable personality should not be left with any class, particularly one with 'cocky' kids!

    Methinks the original poster acted in an unprofessional manner. After all she shouldn't have left the room to do photocopying should she? Bit silly that.

    She should have made sure her student had the correct resources before starting the lesson shouldnt she?

    Isn't that what a mentor is supposed to do?

    No correct resources - no lesson I'm afraid.

    Do it properly or not at all.

    Im not saying the student didnt act in an unprofessional manner, she quite clearly did, but she isn't the professional. The teacher is.
     
  7. EmmaBB

    EmmaBB New commenter

    fergieout89, there is no reason why the teacher shouldn't leave the room. The teacher does not have to be in every single lesson, in fact it hinders the progression of the ITT student.

    You should always be somewhere near in case you need to be sent for and check on the behaviour of a class.

    However, to OP, yes you have done the right thing. A major cause for concern. Imagine what would happen if a qualified member of staff did such a thing.

    Personally, if a student isn't fully prepared, I sometime let them sink. They need to learn what happens when you don't prepare properly.
     
  8. Fergie- I have actually checked and PGCE students are allowed to be left with classes, for short periods of time. I felt very confident in the PGCE students ability to handle the class, she has managed to control much worse ones without my intervention. I am obviously a bad judge of character. May I also say that I am not her mentor we have an in house head of teacher training who sees all the PGCE students. She (head of training)advised me to leave her for short periods bec

    Have you always had EVERYTHING prepared for a lesson? Learning to prep properly is something PGCE students learn. I was doing her a favour.

    Learning Support Assistants are not there to do photocopying either, teaching assistants do that. LSA's are in class to support a small group of students, in this case 2. She is not an errand woman.
     
  9. It's February and the beginning of the second placement or end of first or a continuation? What are the circumstances of the course?

    I think the actions of hodreadergirl are the ones I would have followed. I would also be looking at ways of supporting the student teacher to get them back on track and review whether they were suited to teaching at a slightly later date.

    Because it has happened once does not mean that it will happen again (and with support, it shouldn't).
     
  10. In response to Post 8 - yeah, I make sure that at the start of the day I have all my resources ready. Teachers get paid really well and I see it as my duty to make sure that I do a professional job.

    That sometimes means getting out of my bed 10 mins early and dashing to the front of the photocopying queue at work. Not a pleasant experience! I love my bed you know!

    In response to the point made about leaving students alone to make their mistakes - I've mentored students and have often left them alone, but only when, in my professional judgement, I think they can cope. Under no circumstances would I leave a student to face a 'cocky' kid, particularly a student that is liable to throw a dictionary in the classroom and swear. Just not right.

    If however, in your professional judgement, this was out of character, you have nothing to worry about. Your original post questioned whether or not you were right to call in her tutor. I think you should have done. I also think if it was out of character the student will be fine and will no doubt learn from the experience and end up a great teacher. Yipee!

    However, if she is struggling and is 'dangerous and unsuitable' she just shouldn't have been left alone in your classroom. Get her 'weeded out' indeed. Well, either that or lend her some much needed support. We aren't all experts when we start are we?

    Rather long-winded eh?! Either way, dont worry hodreadergirl. Could have been avoided but an experience all will learn from no doubt. Take care x
     
  11. I'm a PGCE student and was often left alone on my last placement. In fact, the teachers were sometimes in a different place for the whole of the lesson!
    I preferred it that way as it can be intimidating with an experienced teacher there all the time.

    As for the student who threw the book! If she can't take a bit of insulance then why is she even in teaching?
     
  12. Oh come on! if she threw a book then she has no right to be in the classroom- why should she be given another chance? If your first instinct is to lose it then you do not have the patience to deal with pupils. You need to be self-controlled and adult. I can't beleive that some of you think she'll be a better teacher for it.
     
  13. I can spell believe. Oops.
     
  14. Well guys SMT took statements from several children, from the nice to the nasty and their statements all match up. The PGCE Student threw the dictionary unprovoked.

    She has been dismissed from her placement and has also been deregistered on her PGCE course. The parents of the student are happy with this action, and she has also recieved a warning from the police, which will come up when she is CRB checked. So she will not be able to go onto another PGCE course or work with children.

    The boy involved has a corker of a bruise, right in the centre of his forhead. He was very quiet in lesson today, and not his usual self.

     
  15. The right thing was done. I think people are generally on their best behaviour whilst training so who knows what may have happened down the line. Not everyone is cut out for the job, although this was probably a moment of ill advised pique that has created a lasting effect on this person. Still we all learn from bitter experience.
     
  16. I can't help thinking that the reaction to the PGCE student was a bit extreme here.
    I realise I am not in a position to know all the facts of the incident but it does seem there is a hidden agenda in getting rid of her that fast and effectively destroying all career prospects.
     
  17. If a child threw a book at me, and it hit me hard enough to cause a bruise, I'd want them out, and quick, and I'd kick up a stink till they went.

    An adult should have more self control, and I don't think there should be any question about this. She assaulted the boy.

    Not everyone is cut out for teaching, and to be perfectly honest I'd rather a few more unsuitable candidates were weeded out earlier.
     
  18. I understand all of what you say perhaps I'm just conditioned to expecting no back up for events like this, when it is the child doing the assaulting, particularly verbal abuse etc, and so a situation like this resolved within hours seems alien to me.
     
  19. Elphaba

    Elphaba New commenter

    That's so true pink piglet. I remember when I was training and a child kicked the teacher. Then stormed out of the classroom and returned five minutes later with his sister, who threatened the teacher. The child was sent home and returned to school two days later after writing a letter of apology.
    It is ridiculous the lengths the school in question went to, to punish the PGCE student, after she was verbally abused by a student. Yet, my incident was quickly resolved and the boy returned to school and the teacher was made to continue teaching the boy that kicked her.
     
  20. >>I remember when I was training and a child kicked the teacher. Then stormed out of the classroom and returned five minutes later with his sister, who threatened the teacher. The child was sent home and returned to school two days later after writing a letter of apology. It is ridiculous the lengths the school in question went to, to punish the PGCE student, after she was verbally abused by a student. Yet, my incident was quickly resolved and the boy returned to school and the teacher was made to continue teaching the boy that kicked her.

    I hear what you're saying, but the fact of the matter is that we are TRAINED ADULTS. We're supposed to have very much better self control than the kids are. We're supposed to have learned how to consciously think about managing the behaviour of the other parties and how to control our own emotions appropriately. We don't have hormones whizzing around and peer pressure and all that **** - we've BEEN there, done that and ripped the T shirt. We're not being forced to go to school. We've chosen to go there, and we're being paid for it. And now we're adults who have accepted the responsibility for the safety of a bunch of kids while we try to get them to learn more skills and information.

    So - do I feel sorry for the PGCE student? Yes. But should she have been booted for *throwing a dictionary at a kid's head*?

    Yes. Yes, she should. Because she's supposed to be the grownup in the equation, and even if she can't control everything the kids do to provoke her, she can control herself.
     

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