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A nice but very chatty class

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by oliviabutler, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. <font size="2">I have a very chatty class who are on the whole nice students (one to one they are all very polite etc) I&rsquo;m not a shouty teacher, and am finding it difficult to get them quiet to do the register and to listen to instructions. Does anyone have any good ideas to get students attention without having to shout? Thanks </font>
     
  2. <font size="2">I have a very chatty class who are on the whole nice students (one to one they are all very polite etc) I&rsquo;m not a shouty teacher, and am finding it difficult to get them quiet to do the register and to listen to instructions. Does anyone have any good ideas to get students attention without having to shout? Thanks </font>
     
  3. rainbow_gold

    rainbow_gold New commenter

    I have a very similar class - fairly bright, generally good students who are blatantly testing my boundaries by breaking simple rules (chewing, talking when i am etc). So far I have kept behind select students who are being very lazy or rude and have reiterated my expectations. If they continue I plan to begin issuing break detentions and phoning home, I suspect that this will make them pop their heads back down as they are really not used to being in trouble!
     
  4. There are quite a few threads about this - have a quick search.
    One person suggested asking for quiet and then writing on the board 'I have asked for quiet. If you are not quiet you will stay after the lesson' and then just quietly writing up the names of students talking. When they are quiet explain why you have done this and that you will continue until they can learn to be quiet when asked. The whole situation is very quiet and very clear and shows that you aren't prepared to shout.
    Another suggested whispering to the children at the front about what they are going to do this lesson. Gradually the children will become interested and have to be quiet so they can hear you. But you sound like you are secondary? I feel this would work better in younger primary? I know as a teenager I would have deliberately talked over a teacher who did this. Sad but true. Perhaps I didn't face enough consequences!

     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Here's advice I posted in two other threads - might have relevance for you.
    You need to habituate them to a signal.
    Three steps. First of all, you should be absolutely clear about what your signal is - hand clapping is okay if it works for you, some people use a countdown. Get that on a poster - this is the signal, this is what I expect. For me, it's usually "eyes front, feet on floor, hands on desks, silent and waiting for instructions." Absolutely explicit.
    Secondly, you should use the signal absolutely consistently. Always hand clap. Don't sometimes clap, sometimes shout, sometimes &ldquo;shhh&rdquo;. If you don&rsquo;t take your signal seriously, neither will they.
    Thirdly &ndash; and I think this is the most important step &ndash; give feedback on what they do. Many teachers go &ldquo;3,2,1... okay, turn to page x&rdquo;. Always scan the room and acknowledge individuals who are doing just what you want and, then, those who didn&rsquo;t do it right. So - &ldquo;3,2,1... Jane, you're waiting for instructions, thanks... Joe, your hands are on the desk, good... Carol, you need to stop talking to your neighbour much more quickly next time, that&rsquo;s a warning.&rdquo; The trick is that every child must believe that the signal is being addressed to them and only them &ndash; they can&rsquo;t hide behind the mass. So &ndash; that scanning and feedback is vital to letting them know that you will make sure they they are giving you what you want.
    Of course, you can link this to classwide rewards, which can turn classes round. &ldquo;Everybody settled immediately on the signal there... well done. That;s a point towards the word game with prizes at the end of the week.&rdquo; Of course, the corollary of that is that you have to make sure that the class only get the reward if they deserve it &ndash; so you must be prepared to say, &ldquo;Carol, you still aren&rsquo;t settling quickly enough. The class doesn&rsquo;t earn its point.
     

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