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A Level Product Design: Design Classic / Design Icon

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by Get_me_outta_here!, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. What is (in layman's terms) the difference between a Design Classic and a Design Icon?
    I'm searching the net and I'm beginning to confuse myself! Any ideas?
    Thanks
     
  2. What is (in layman's terms) the difference between a Design Classic and a Design Icon?
    I'm searching the net and I'm beginning to confuse myself! Any ideas?
    Thanks
     
  3. I would suggest that a design classic has a historical context to it and has stood the test of time, and a design icon is a modern piece such as an Alessi object that could become a design classic given time.
     
  4. Wouldn't a design classic refer to such things are the London underground map, mini skirt, the mini etc. Whilst a design icon would refer to designers such as David Mellor, Ron Arad, Robin Day etc?
    JJ
     
  5. I am actually writing a dissertation involving this very subject at the moment. Books in my bibliography include Design Icons of the Twetieth Century, and Twentieth Century Design Classics.Whats interesting is that they both contain no less than 22 of the same designs.
    I would describe a design icon as something that people remember as it has a strong image and can be attributed to nostalgia. Design classics are recognised for their contribution to design and have become the established model or definitive within their field.
    I would suggest that similarities between 'icons' and 'classics' spans from the enduring image and significance of such objects.
     
  6. TES Resource Team

    TES Resource Team Occasional commenter Institute Enrolment Advisor

    Something I came up with recently along with my A level students studying product design with regard to Iconic design. We tended to focus on Iconic rather than classic.....classic is a little open ended. A Morris Minor is a classic car....but it is not an Icon, whereas the Beetle is both classic and Iconic. All old cars are labelled classic cars, few are Iconic,,,,
    ICONIC= SPUR
    S: Symbolic, can represent a movement, a time, fashion,ideals, design beliefs or principles
    P: Provenance, it has a rich and important history, it changed things, affected the users
    U:Unique, different when first released, since copied but still seen as the original, genesis
    R:Resonance, people remember it, evokes passion, is still relevant or even still used

    See what you think...my pupils can now tell you exactly why a barcelona chair is an Iconic design and why the W.W Stool by Phillipe Starck is not.
    Cheers
    Spencer Herbert
    TES DT Advisor
     
  7. Spencer - Thanks for the reply and apologies for the late reply by myself. The post that you've made is excellent and I'll be introducing this method to my Year 12 PD groups.
    Thanks again
    Lee
     
  8. TES Resource Team

    TES Resource Team Occasional commenter Institute Enrolment Advisor

    No problem Lee, will be doing the exact same thing next week with my year 12's. Actually used SPUR in an observed Ofsted lesson recently and the inspector really liked it. The students will all no doubt go straight for the iphone 4 as an icon, mine did!! Does'nt fit as well as the simple Sony Walkman (original version) though.
    Cheers
    Spencer Herbert
    TES Advisors Team
     

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