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A Level computing

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by KevMitson, May 2, 2011.

  1. Further to my last post, what computer language do those of you that teach A level computing deem to be the best for the various courses.
    My speciality is Java but feel this would be to difficult for some to grasp. I have dabbled in C++ and VB. I would have thought VB using VB express (free version) would be the most straight foward to teach although visual C++ or C# may be the way to go.
    I have seen people mention Python as being the way forward, but I have no experince in this.

    Any advice greatly received.

    Kev
     
  2. Further to my last post, what computer language do those of you that teach A level computing deem to be the best for the various courses.
    My speciality is Java but feel this would be to difficult for some to grasp. I have dabbled in C++ and VB. I would have thought VB using VB express (free version) would be the most straight foward to teach although visual C++ or C# may be the way to go.
    I have seen people mention Python as being the way forward, but I have no experince in this.

    Any advice greatly received.

    Kev
     
  3. The students can get Visual Studio professional version for free if you register your school with microsoft dreamspark so I'd say C# or VB.net is the way to go. We use VB.net as I think the syntax is more friendly than C style languages.
    I just do console applications for a long time, getting the basics - in contrast to text books which tend to create windows applications from lesson 1. IMO, the problem with starting out with windows apps is I have ended up teaching lots about individual components e.g. how to do various things with listviews etc all of which is irrelevant to the exam.
     
  4. Python is widely recommended for many reasons - the main reason being the ease with which students can learn programming. It won't do everything, but the things it does so well has been the reason why it's has such a great take-up.

    Most teachers will, quite naturally, want to stick with what they are used to. But I don't know of many (if any) who got stuck into Python, taught it for a year, and regretted doing so. That speaks volumes.
     
  5. Tosha

    Tosha New commenter

    I'm trying to decide betweem VB and Python as a teaching language for the programming Unit in OCR's new ICT spec. From experience kids seem to like the visual element of VB.
     
  6. I've never touched python myself, but can understand why people go with VB. The ease of GUI creation makes it more engaging, whilst the syntax is fairly simple to get your head around. Not done VB.NET, only VB6, but hey, it is a good starter regardless of how out of date it might be.

    Java or C++ as a starter language is not a good idea, I don't get why people would promote these.
     

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