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A boy that finds it difficult to sit still.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by pocoyo, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. I have a boy in my Year 1 class who finds it very difficult to sit still. After a few months it seems that he cannot help this. I have tried giving him something to fiddle with but he quite often ends up throwing it up in the air. He always looks upset and dishearted when I have to tell him to try and sit still. I feel bad as I know he cannot help it but it's a constant niggly problem for me and the children sitting around him. They become very distracted by him and he quite often touches other children's hair which is why I moved him to the front. He doesn't seem to have an awareness of other children's persoanl space as he will often squash right up to them on the carpet or turn around put his face right up close to children behind him. As well as this he often kneels up on the carpet so I am constantly tyelling him to sit down or I am moving him away from the carpet area.

    Does anyone have any advice or ways of dealing with this in a positve way?

    Thank you.

    x
     
  2. I have a boy in my Year 1 class who finds it very difficult to sit still. After a few months it seems that he cannot help this. I have tried giving him something to fiddle with but he quite often ends up throwing it up in the air. He always looks upset and dishearted when I have to tell him to try and sit still. I feel bad as I know he cannot help it but it's a constant niggly problem for me and the children sitting around him. They become very distracted by him and he quite often touches other children's hair which is why I moved him to the front. He doesn't seem to have an awareness of other children's persoanl space as he will often squash right up to them on the carpet or turn around put his face right up close to children behind him. As well as this he often kneels up on the carpet so I am constantly tyelling him to sit down or I am moving him away from the carpet area.

    Does anyone have any advice or ways of dealing with this in a positve way?

    Thank you.

    x
     
  3. I can sympathise because I have one of these too and he's in Year 4. He wriggles and jiggles and constantly moves in his seat as well as around the room (given half a chance). He often slides halfway across his table or slides down his chair so far that only his head can be seen. He sits up and down, he curls his legs up and down and his hands move and fiddle with things on his desk. I'm exhausted just watching him.
    When he came in my class in September, I started off by constantly reminding him to sit still, but to be honest it A) became quite a chore, B) was upsetting for him to be constantly nagged, C) disrupted my teaching and D) didn't have any effect on his behaviour.
    I called mum in to see me so that she was aware that it was causing a problem and he has been referred by the doctor. I have also written a letter to the doctor (as requested by mum) setting out the details from an educational point of view.
    I am convinced that he doesn't do it on purpose because he exhibits traits (strongly) of ADHD and he also doesn't like being 'told off'. He's a really nice kid and my constant nagging was affecting our relationship. The other children are really good at just ignoring him so, unless he wanders around the room, I try to just ignore his shuffling around as much as I can.
    The only suggestion I have is to sit him on his own mat (carpet squares are good for this) away from the other children and insist that he stays on his own 'magic square'. This should at least stop him from distracting the other children by touching them. Could you give him something to fiddle with which is attached to the mat in some way so that he can't throw it up in the air? I'm thinking about those little mini locks and keys or perhaps those plastic cable ties.
    Sorry not to have any more suggestions, I just wanted to sympathise with you and let you know you are not alone in having a wriggle-bottom in your class.
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I would have him sitting at the back of the carpet so that if he kneels up it doesn't disturb anyone and so can be ignored. Same as the wriggling about. I have two of them in year 2 and they sit at the back for just this reason. I would also train the other children to ignore the wriggling and moving.

    However I would have very clear rules about no touching others on the carpet. If he does so, then he is sent to sit away from the carpet. Send him somewhere where he can still see and hear the lesson, so doesn't lose out, but is definitely 'away' from the others. No second chances on this one.
     
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Both people's advice here is good. A special cushion/mat away from other children is a good idea and a <u>small piece</u> of Blutack (other variations are available!) is less likely to get thrown in the air? And a chance to 'cuddle a special class bear/animal etc. for when he does sit still. Ensure others get the chance to 'cuddle' the toy too, so he doesn't think it belongs to him.
     
  6. Why are we always so quick to 'diagnose' these children (usually boys) just because they are a bit wriggly, I'm 30 and I'm rubbish at sitting still! It's usually something they gradually grow out of. I had a child a couple of years back with exactly the same fidgetty and wriggly issues, I've got his class back this year and he is getting slightly better as he gets older. We have developed a signal that he recognises and stops fidgeting when he sees me do it, saves me having to say his name, saves his self esteem.
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I agree, which is why mine sit at the back and can wriggle to their heart's content. The class ignore the wriggling and so do I.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Some children can't stop
     
  9. Hi and thank you for all your responses.
    I cannot sit him at the back. I had to move him to the front because he can't stop himself from touching people's hair infront of him.
    I think it's more the distraction for the other children that concerns me as they all sit together on the arpet being in Year 1. I could try sitting him in his own space on a cusion. That might work.
    Thanks again. x
     
  10. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Then sit him far enough at the back that he can't reach anyone.

    Putting a child who cannot sit still and keep his hands to himself right at the front is asking for trouble. He CANNOT do as you want, the class cannot ignore him right in front of them, you are driven nuts and the poor child gets in trouble repeatedly for something he cannot help!
     
  11. If he can't sit still, then it is likely he has dyspraxia or another related condition.

    Have you spoken to your SENCO about him?

    He should be assessed by an Occupational Therapist.

    A Move N Sit cushion can help him. It makes his wiggling far less disturbing to the other kids.
     
  12. And you must tell his parents that you have concerns about him, so that they can take him to the GP and ask for a referral.

    They might not know that his problems are out of the ordinary if you don't clearly tell them.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Often these fidgety children have sensory processing difficulties and the movement is stimulation for inactive or over active sensory responses. I agree that it shouldn't be ignored especially if he genuinely can't control it. I would seek a referral to an OT.
     

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