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A 2 hour staff meeting!

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by minnieminx, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Meeting length and frequency are only union guidelines, they are not rules and are not enforceable.

    There is no requirement to finish meetings in an hour at all. Nor to only have one a week.

    I agree with the vote with your feet idea, if you don't like your school's way of doing things then start to look elsewhere.
     
  2. Oh and as for displays, yes we as teachers SHOULD NOT do them. My classroom is completely bare, and I am just waiting for resources to sort it out...SLT were not impressed with the 'dullness' of my classroom, stating it has a very poor learning environment. ...I can not do much but to go the ladies in resources...oh happy days
     
  3. chrisoakey

    chrisoakey Occasional commenter

    I disagree strongly with your last point, Minnieminx. Folk should not leave a school but stay and either vote with your feet, literally say polite goodbyes and leave after 1 hour or complain through formal procedures. It is ineffective if folk just move on. That way nothing ever changes for the better and rapid turnover of staff is disastrous for everyone concerned.
     
  4. Unions have no teeth...whats the point spending time and money trumping up guidelines to supposedly protect teachers when schools take no notice of them??
    ...and, as for colleagues shrugging shoulders and saying staff meeting of this length are the norm....get some BOL-LAX and get together and tell SLT that we have better things to do than getting bored by 2 hour meetings...what a waste of time!!
     
  5. Crowbob

    Crowbob Lead commenter

    Was it scheduled as a 1 hour meeting? Or as a 1.5 hour meeting?
    It is <u>not</u> a "rule".
    and they are just that, guidelines.
    People should be wary of just leaving meetings part-way through, if they are part of directed time. If the meetings are scheduled as 2 hours of directed time and you leave after one hour, this is an absence.
     
  6. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Yes indeed, and what's more the guidelines haven't been "put in place" at all. They are just a union campaigning position. Schools - heads, governing bodies - haven't accepted them or agreed that they are appropriate so they can't legitimately be described as 'in place', let alone as 'a rule'.

    It's not surprising that teachers have a poor reputation with many parts of the population with an attitude like that. Just how much sympathy do you expect from the country at large because your meeting overran by 5 - 10 minutes?
     
  7. The 'wise ones' who enforce these stultifying, marathon meetings on us can have no sense of irony. How many of us have been talked at for over ninety minutes on the need for pace, or, my favourite, that even the most intelligent and motivated people have an attention span of only twenty minutes.
    So frustrating, as you sit being told how to do something pointless for a couple of hours, is how could better use the time getting on with it.
     
  8. casper

    casper New commenter

    Funnily enough, although it not funny I was talking to a friend last night about this. Two days of teaching and leaning at inset. When to teach for pupils to learn, staff needed to catch up with their departments and make sure that everything is ready for teaching pupils. Pupils do best when they are encouraged and praised, but somehow staff in schools do not need encourgement and a kind word occasionally??
     
  9. Exactly! Would pupils be extected to make progress when fed a solid diet of criticism.
     
  10. scienceteacha

    scienceteacha New commenter

    Some schools would probably argue that if its within the 1265 hours, its allowed. And academies probably do what the **** they like!
    Do check whether there isn't some 'twilight' deal going on whereby a few long meetings tot up to an extra day off somewhere. Lots of schools do this.

     
  11. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    How to end up in extremely hot water. There is NO rule at all. Meetings can be as long as the HT deems them necessary.
    How to get sacked in one easy move!
     
  12. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Or sit through a Powerpoint presentation of about 332 slides on making lessons interesting so the customers don't get bored, especially when the genius who put the Powerpoint together used the blue background with the circles.
     
  13. My favourite meetings are the ones when they've already sent an email out to all of the staff, and then decide to have a meeting after school, where they just 'retell' us what was in the emails!
    Unfortunately OP I think that's just how things are. We usually have longish meetings where I am (although none as long as 2 hours yet, apart from when we had an INSET and got a massive breakdown of all the GCSE and A level results), but we just go with it.

     
  14. If you only had 1 hour meetings at your previous school you were very lucky! Why did you leave? We have two hour meetings every week plus a weekly half hour lunchtime meeting. We have to attend 3 evening meetings for parents this term and we are expected to particpate in PTA events at the weekend at least once a term. Anyone who voices dissent classed as lacking enthusiasm and don't expect your union to do anything either.
     
  15. ScienceGuy

    ScienceGuy Established commenter

    The lunchtime meeting is a definite no no and the sheer number of meetings you have to attend suggests that you are doingmore than the 1265 hours. I would ask your head for a copy of the directed time timetable and only do what is on there.
    If you are a member of NUT then you will be on a work to rule action from 26/9 (NASUWT members are already on this) and can, with the legitimate support of your union, refuse to do these things. It is management like this which has caused the problems in the first place.
     
  16. secretsiren

    secretsiren Star commenter

    I don't think sympathy's expected, but perhaps an acknowledgement that most teachers (especially NQTs) will have to do a fair few other things outside of actual teaching and meeting time would be useful. I totted up the hours I worked last week (a minimum marking week as most classes obviously haven't done assessments etc) and it was well over 60 hours. Every single meeting I had ran over by 30+ minutes, the Parents' Information Evening ran over by more than an hour...which impacted on little things like my children not having any childcare, and the amount of time (and energy) I had to do marking, preparation, making resources etc. Regardless of what the 'population' may think, the vast majority of teachers don't simply walk out the door, go home and do nothing. I do marking, planning, prep at home after the children are in bed and it's usually 90 minutes or more every evening. When your SLT keep meetings running over the time allotted, it's not just annoying and inconvenient for those of us with...oh, hobbies, children, lives outside of school, it also eats into the time you have to do essential work.
    NQTs usually have meetings on top of the scheduled school meetings, as well as induction meetings and - usually - having to spend more time than experienced teachers on marking, moderation, standardisation etc. An extra ten minutes might not sound like much, but when you know you have a full day the day afterwards, a Uni essay due in, a research project to begin, a stack of books to mark that you haven't had a chance to look at yet, a particularly tricky class to plan for, perhaps an observation scheduled, then that extra ten minutes starts to seem a bit irritating.

     
  17. clementinesandbrazilnuts

    clementinesandbrazilnuts New commenter

    What I will say, is that frequent long meetings are an indicaton of a school that isn't working so well.
    My last school was terrible. It went into special measures and the Head was finally sacked, although she managed to create absolute chaos and ruined lives of children and adults before she went, and we had 2 hour staff meetings.
    At present, our meetings are an hour. We get tea and cake, too [​IMG] I am much happier.
     

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