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20 min lesson yr5/6 in headteacher interview

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by fulloffun, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    As part of an interview for headship of a small school I will be required to give a 20 min lesson in a class of yr5/yr6 children.I know what I need to cover in terms of engaging the class, (classroom control) everyone learning etcAs I generally teach KS1 can you please suggest what would wow the governors?
     
  2. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    As part of an interview for headship of a small school I will be required to give a 20 min lesson in a class of yr5/yr6 children.I know what I need to cover in terms of engaging the class, (classroom control) everyone learning etcAs I generally teach KS1 can you please suggest what would wow the governors?
     
  3. mrkeys

    mrkeys Occasional commenter

    Not wishing to be unhelpful...... but if you are an aspiring HT, then you really should know the answer yourself.
    I think maybe you are not ready for such a challenge.
     
  4. Have you been given any subjects or is it your choice?
     
  5. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    My choice ,that is why I was wondering about introducing a topic to debate with an open ended outcome or to teach a specific subject with clear objective.
     
  6. A debate might be a bit risky as the children may not have had much previous experience debating and you might not get great quality. I'd be a lot more structured- but something fun and engaging. In addition, depending on the context and type of school behaviour might require something with a more directed pace and sequence.
    I was also thinking you might link it to the fact that you are applying for the job as their headteacher. You could:
    - get them to write interview questions and model answers: they could come and act these out
    - get them to write an advert for a newspaper
    - get them to write a brief job description
    - get them to plan and act out an advert for their school encouraging candidates to apply

    You'd have to pace it quickly and have a clear structure. I would offer models of outcomes as much as possible and (or at least) ensure you have a shared criteria of what a good outcome would look like. When sharing models- note their features.
    Even this, though, would be difficult to fit into such a short slot.
    Alternatively, I'd do some drama. Characterisation is a great one to do. Some ideas:
    - Through the door: Get the class quiet and facing the front them go out and come in again. Slam a book on the table and say, 'I've just about had enough of this' and cross you arms. Children talk in pairs about what mood they think you are in and why. Share ideas. (BTW I usually use a throwing object rather than hands up for speaking). Ask them to think of some mood words and list them on the board. Individual children, of your choice, choose a word and go out and come in again in that way. Others guess the mood- but they must expain the evidence. I tell children that characters are always SAD (speech, action and description) as this is the evidence that shows a character's mood. The objective of this is 'To be able to find evidence for character inference in texts'. Go around the class- using the throwing object- and ask the children to say something that a sleepy person would say, excited person etc. If they are sensible you can do this around each table by giving each table their own throwing object. End by showing a piece of text with speech, action and description in it (use a classic text if poss. but make it a short one). Then show a question: How is ?? feeling and how do you know? Rather than ask them to give you an answer- give them on tables 4 or 5 written answers. Ask them to choose the best answer and why: 1. He's angry because it's annoying. 2. He's angry. 3. He's angry. We know this because he clenches his fists and stamps his feet. He also yells, 'Get out!' at the girl and his face is described as red with rage. And so on. Ask one person from each table to feedback on the order they put the questions in and why.

    - Do it like this: This is a stengthening verbs and adverbs activity.
    Play word tennis first- 2 children face each other at the front of the class. The category is verbs- they must each say a verb, if they pause, say a word already said or a word that's not a verb they are out. Then get the children to play in pairs at their tables. Then do this for adverbs.
    Now list some strong verbs and adverbs on the board- with the children's help. Choose ones that will go together and make them challenging, but ones that can be acted out. Then you choose a verb and adverb and act it out- meandered longingly. The children tell you which 2 words you have chosen and then children come out to act it out. This can move to pairs if they are senisble and there's enough space in the room.
    End by modelling writing a sentence using some of the words- The strange, lonely man wandered listlessly through the deserted streets. Ask the children to try and use some of the new vocabulary. The objective is 'To use strong verbs and adverbs in sentences'.

    That's all I have time to write for now. If these aren't useful- drop me a message and I can send you some more ideas.
    There is a bit of an issue with differentation- but it's pretty accessible and I can;t see how you can get this right in a class you don't know in 20 mins.. If you have TA support make sure you know in advance and make sure you have some info about the children and position them and yourself strategically during tasks.
    Whatever you do try to:
    - ensure good pace
    - fun and engagement
    - focus and structure
    - shared learning objective
    - include self and peer assessment (you can just get the children to show you using numbers of fingers or thumbometer if they think they have acheived the objective or you can use the throwing object and get some children to complete the sentence, 'I know I have acheived the objective today because....'
    Think of some challenging/extension questions: Can you think of a time when you felt that that? What else do we do when we are distressed?
     
  7. mychuck

    mychuck New commenter

    Mrs. C has been really helpful and given great advice as she always does but I'm slightly inclined to agree with the poster who said that perhaps you should already know what to do. If your experience is in KS1 surely you know how to engage children and put the 'wow' into lessons.
    I'm a KS2 practioner mainly and as HT I observe lessons throughout the whole primary phase. I know a good lesson and I think you might be doing the small school a diservice in applying if you've not got a whole school perspective. You have to work extremely hard in a small school wearing many different 'hats', asking about what you should teach in a lesson observation is slightly concerning.
    Just my opinion.
     
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Mrs C, are you going to go in and do the rest of the job for this poster if they get it?
    If you can't come up with what will 'wow' a governing body all by yourself, you can't expect to be able to recognise it when your staff do it and you are certainly not ready for headship.
    I'm shocked, to be frank.

     
  9. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Not shocked, but professionally disappointed.
    Agreed.
    There will, in the not too distant future, be a cohort of new and fresh headteachers who all began their NPQH courses with absolutely identical application forms thanks to the 'support' they received from a poster on these forums a year or two ago.
    I have even interviewed a teacher whose lesson plan for the 30 minute observed lesson consisted of a print out of a post on the TES web site (Primary Forum) with the HTML address still printed across the top.
    She didn't get the job, and I told her precisely why.
     
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Presumably, mrs C also gives lesson plans she's written to any candidate for a teaching job at her school - if she thinks it's OK to hand a plan (of incredible detail, I might add) to a candidate for headship, anyone applying to her school deserves no less from her.
     
  11. A bit unfair!
    Any candidate can get lesson plans from a colleague, internet or published book.
    It's whether they can deliver it and adapt it to the needs of the children as they teach that counts.
     
  12. (Sorry pressed post before I meant to).
    As a headteacher, don't you ever ask for the SEF of a school that has outstanding self evaluation? A copy of curriculum plans from a school with an outstanding curriculum? A copy of a School Development Plan? Policies? (and so on).
    It doesn't mean you can't write one yourself- you have to, it has to be personalised to your school. However, you look for models and benchmarks, pick out good ideas and use them.
    How would you feel if a colleague you asked refused to share based on the notion that it meant you weren't a capable head?
    As I said, there are lots of sources of lesson ideas and some one off lesson ideas won't tell you if a teacher can make formative assessments and match short and medium term planning to needs. It won't create the classroom ethos and relationships and pace for the teacher. They must do that for themselves.

     
  13. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Requests for help with interview lessons are a common theme on JobSeekers.
    So common that I have a ready-made reply which I take straight out of the oven in true Blue Peter fashion.
    * * * * * *
    Well done for getting that interview!
    However . . .
    Sorry, but . . . I don't give help, ideas, comments or ANYTHING about interview lessons.
    And I don't suggest that any other poster does, either.
    There are 3 main reasons for that:
    Firstly,
    it's got to be you, and your ideas, so that you feel comfortable about
    what you're doing, and so that the school sees <u>you</u>, and not me or
    somebody else. And secondly and more importantly, because <u>you</u> are the expert here, not me!

    So you will just have to sit down, think of what your aims are (including the Ofsted criteria - one of the links in the Interview Tips clickable in the Welcome thread says what schools are looking for in interview lessons),
    Take a look also at my Possible interview questions clickable in the Welcome thread
    Make
    sure you plan a lesson that enables children to progress, and have a
    plan that you will press on the observer that includes differentiation,
    just in case you don't get round to using it in the lesson itself.

    And
    a third reason is that this is a public forum, and other candidates for
    the same job might see the suggestions too . . . and wouldn't you look
    daft doing the same thing!

    * * * * * *
    Mrs C went to a great deal of trouble to "help" the candidate, but I don't suggest that anybody uses her suggestions.
    For all the reasons set out by the other posters.
    And for my third reason above.

    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice
    service runs seminars and workshops, one-to-one careers and
    applications advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application
    review service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones,
    and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at
    application letters, executive summaries and interviews.
    The next Workshops I'm doing that still have vacancies are on Sunday 13th and Friday 25th February. There is also a specialist Workshop for applications to SLT on Saturday February 19th.
    Go to https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storyCode=6060678 for more details of these and other seminars.
    Look forward to seeing you!

     
  14. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Last year I interviewed 6 candidates for a job. 4 did the same lesson, which was suggested on the primary forum.
    They didn't get the job.
     
  15. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Good for you. I wish more HTs would do likewise and make their actions known.
    Trouble is, the OP is applying for a headteacher's position and is asking for advice about teaching a class and what would "wow" the governors. Doesn't he/she <u>know</u>?
    So much for being able to "Demonstrate the principles and practice of effective teaching and learning" [from the National Standards for Headteachers]
     
  16. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    I don't think so.
    Not in the slightest.
    The OP is applying for a headteacher's post. Even if experienced more in KS1 than in KS2, the successful candidate at the school will be responsible for the teaching and learning in Years 5 and 6 and, if the OP is not aware of what constitutes effective teaching and learning for pupils in these years, then he/she should not be applying for the job.
     

  17. <ol style="margin-top:0cm;"><li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">I question the effectiveness of the 20 minute one off as a recruitment tool (even for a teacher- never mind a head). It tells you nothing about the teacher&rsquo;s ability to: match tasks (they don&rsquo;t know the class); plan effective teaching sequences; use assessment for learning; ensure good progress, develop independence or build relationships and the focus has to be on teaching more than learning in this context. I&rsquo;d be much more impressed by a prospective head who can assess work in all key stages and set curricular targets. <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">Not sure, Theo, how you marry giving TES workshops/coaching and advice on NQT and SLT applications and interviews, but it&rsquo;s not acceptable to give advice on other aspects of the selection process. Perhaps it's only ok if it sells papers or is paid for but not free. <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">I think there needs to be some recognition that someone teaching in another key stage, especially EYFS, will find it difficult to adapt to Y5/6. It&rsquo;s a completely different curriculum and approach and I am sure that most honest primary heads would admit they would feel more confident in some key stages than others. <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">However, this doesn&rsquo;t mean that heads can&rsquo;t make effective judgements about the quality of teaching across a school. As a secondary head, Middlemarch, I am sure you make judgements about subject areas you have never taught (or seldom taught) and if you were honest could you deliver as good a lesson in ICT as maths or MFL or PE?? It doesn&rsquo;t mean your judgements aren&rsquo;t valid, engaged children who are making progress aren&rsquo;t difficult to spot. <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">We do actually give a lesson to plan to our teaching applicants! We ask them to teach a significant group and give them a plan and some resources. This means we aren&rsquo;t judging the ability to borrow a one off from a friend or the amount of time they have been able to devote to going over and over the lesson and making/buying resources, but the teacher&rsquo;s ability to ask extension questions, offer access, respond and adapt to children&rsquo;s needs as learning happens. We then ask them to reflect at the end and evaluate the learning and describe a plan for the next lesson. <li style="margin:0cm 0cm 0pt;tab-stops:list 36.0pt;" class="MsoNormal">We all seek advice and support about interviews (or I am sure most of us do). I am sure on your last application, you asked a trusted friend of colleague to look over your application letter, bounced ideas for the presentation, rehearsed possible questions. I have/did and I gladly offer any support I can to others too. </ol> &lsquo;Nuff said. Accept my minority status! Bowing out gracefully (while tripping over the coconut door mat).
    Think it was stated in another thread how it was asset in headship to have a thick skin! :)

     
  18. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Excuse me?
    ____________________________________________________________




    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.




    The TES Careers Advice
    service runs seminars and workshops, one-to-one careers and
    applications advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application
    review service.




    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones,
    and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at
    application letters, executive summaries and interviews.




    The next Workshops I'm doing that still have vacancies are on Sunday 13th and Friday 25th February. There is also a specialist Workshop for applications to SLT on Saturday February 19th.




    Go to https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storyCode=6060678 for more details of these and other seminars.




    Look forward to seeing you!

     
  19. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    You are entirely missing the point. The selection panel wanted the candidates to teach a lesson to a specific year group and this will almost certainly have been to see if - as a prospective headteacher - they knew how to plan and deliver a good lesson.
    If they wanted a head who merely went to TES for things they were clearly incapable of doing - as this candidate has shown - they'd have said so.
    If you had merely offered an idea 'Why not do a lesson on x?' and left it at that, I'd have been fine with it. But you offered an outrageous amount of detail - what were you thinking of?
    Your point about a head being able to make valid judgements about areas outside their specific expertise was absolutely right - all the more reason to tell a candidate who shows (by asking to be told what to do) they cannot do so to go away and learn how.
    I was asked for a headship interview to observe a geography lesson (definitely not my area, gave up geography age 14) and then submit my notes, etc giving detailed judgements on the lesson, pupils' learning and progress, etc. As you say, I needed to be able to do it - and so should this candidate without asking you to do it for them.
     
  20. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Actually - no. never have, never would do. How would it help me evaluate my own school's strengths and weaknesses? It's also an erroneous analogy, because the OP has been asked to do something as part of a job selection process, the epxectation being that the canddiates will do it forthemselves, in order that the panel can select the person best able to do so. Whether or not you think such an activity is a good way of selecting a head is neither here nor there - that's what this panel wants.
    A better analogy for what the OP has asked for (and what you've supplied, in massive detail) is asking someone else to write your letter of application for you, or write your essay for your degree. Things you're expected to do and be able to do yourself.
     

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