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15 minutes a day for mental maths and spelling, reading and comprehension in secondary

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by willsonroad, Sep 9, 2020.

  1. willsonroad

    willsonroad New commenter

    Hi

    Is there anyone who uses a programme that encourages fifteen minutes repetitive training every day to help with English and maths. This would be for students in mainstream secondary school who have EHCPs who are behind in English and/or maths. I do not want to use break or social time as this seems like punishment so would like to work it into the school learning day. Would like to know how other secondary schools manage this please?
     
  2. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    From memory we used to negotiate time from PSHCE / MFL - so longer sessions with an extracted group .Curriculum leaders were very precious about losing students from their subject areas!

    I get the little and often/ over learning approach - we used to have an LA SpLD specialist who withdrew from tutor time but for it to work it had to run like clock work - students could / would be late or forget and be committed . We were paying for this so costly ?

    We were totally committed to delivering in class support but our cohorts were those with hugely depressed literacy scores/Mathematically weak so we had to be creative with our curriculum model - front loading alternative ‘needs led ‘ / utilising the skills of the then AS teacher / prioritising literacy across the curriculum ..... It made for sense for us as a setting to tackle this way and then tailor bespoke intervention packages for those students with complex needs. What ever you decide the delivery is only as good ad the deliverer ( training is key ) and the those managing the sessions need to be made accountable.
     

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