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15 minute maths reception induction. Need help!!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jfield, May 22, 2011.

  1. jfield

    jfield New commenter

    Firstly good luck with the interview. I think what you do on the day should be something you feel comfortable with - the children will sense if you aren't sure and the younger ones tend to feel unsure themselves then and can end up getting upset and/or losing interest. Then the behaviour can start to wane - so whatever you do make sure you are happy with it.
    Ideally you should try something that is interactive and engages all of the children. Get them moving around if possible - they shouldn't spend more than ten mins on the carpet ideally.
    An activity that my Rec class love is "voting". We voted for our favourite food, crisps flavours, books, TV, games, toys, films, superheroes - you name it, we'll vote for it!
    But we do it very physically - so for example, you could choose three different books and briefly explain what each one is about. Then three chn stand in different parts of the room holding one book - the rest move to the one they want you to read.
    Give them about thirty seconds to choose their spot and count down from 5 to end the voting period. Then go to each group and collectively count how many per group. There's your basic counting under PSRN numbers.
    The questions that will ensue - which books has more/less votes? How do we know that? Can anyone write those numbers on the board for us? - would not only provide an assessment for any teacher but also extend the maths learning and vocab. And it comes under PSRN Calculation.
    The reward of course is that you read the book to them!
    If you have time, print off a picture of the three books and put on a large sheet of paper. You can write the numbers under each book to leave a visual memory for the class to refer to.
    Hope this has helped.
    Lastly good luck and let us know how you get on!


     

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