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10 days between jobs - what should we do?

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by mariaaitken, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. My husband and I are heading off to our first overseas job on 1st August. As we are currently working in the UK, that leaves us with about 10 days between jobs. We are trying to work out what would be the best way of spending our time as we know that we will be shattered after a hectic school year and also slightly nervous about our move / new school / leaving friends and family / renting out our flat.

    At the moment we are trying to work out whether a short holiday in the sun would be a great way to relax, or yet another thing to worry about before moving.

    Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. My husband and I are heading off to our first overseas job on 1st August. As we are currently working in the UK, that leaves us with about 10 days between jobs. We are trying to work out what would be the best way of spending our time as we know that we will be shattered after a hectic school year and also slightly nervous about our move / new school / leaving friends and family / renting out our flat.

    At the moment we are trying to work out whether a short holiday in the sun would be a great way to relax, or yet another thing to worry about before moving.

    Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks.
     
  3. EmmaVM

    EmmaVM New commenter

    My advice would be based on my experience, which may not fit your situation.
    Do you speak the language? Do you have accommodation provided? Have you ever visited the location before?

    We moved to Germany without speaking the language but with a relocation expert for support. The apartment was empty, we had furniture waiting to be delivered and our personal belongings arriving within a couple of days. Luckily we had a hotel for several days and were able to extend this. It is normal for rental accommodation in Germany to have no light fittings (just the wires hanging from very high ceilings) no kitchen (just the pipes and waste visible in the wall) and only the bathroom in working order.
    When shopping nowhere (even Ikea) takes credit cards so you must have immediate access to cash!
    Many shops don't open until 10am on Saturday, close between 4 and 6pm (if not already at lunchtime) and only gift shops and petrol stations are open on Sunday.
    Major cities are more like the UK, but cultural differences can affect many parts of normal life: it is not allowed to wash your car on the street, or on your rented parking space, you may not throw your rubbish in the recycling bins after 7pm at night, you must be quiet between 11am and 3 pm in apartment buildings (this can include hoovering or using the washing machine).

    All these things take time to adjust to so unless you have extensive experience of your new home, lots of information in advance or like to just jump in the deep end of life, I would suggest going straight to your new location. Even if this means booking a hotel for a week until your permanent accommodation is ready, you will have more time to explore and find out about the place before starting work.

    After 5 years in Germany I can't imagine coming back to the UK. No shopping on a Sunday is bliss, real relaxation at the weekend! Using cash means no more regular credit cards bills (apart from holidays). German efficiency, autobahns and festivals every weekend throughout summer (beer, wine, onions, potatoes, anything is an excuse for a party). Why would we want to leave?

    Enjoy your new adventure, and don't be surprised if you love it so much you decide to stay away until retirement in the sun somewhere...
     
  4. Hi Emma,

    We have fully furnished accommodation and support with moving, but the school has told us that there will be minimal staff around to support us before 1st August. However exploring a new city without any work commitments does sound like a great idea. Thank you!
     
  5. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Hmmm, assuming you don't need to prepare for a new curriculum/year group I'd say a holiday is an ideal option. You haven't mentioned which country you will be working in so it is hard to suggest a good move i.e. you could arrive early in some places, drop your stuff and head for a break but in others with more complicated visa arrangements that may not be as easy as you think with the school needing to complete paperwork before your VOA runs out. Staying somewhere en route would also be a good option.
     
  6. We're in a similar situation and frankly, we are getting on that plane and going straight to our new home. I finish on the 20th July, leave here on the 21st July and start induction on the 25th July. Start teaching on the 6th August. Phew! Slightly concerned but very excited and cannot wait. I think that by the time we get to July we'll be itching to get going. Personally I would take the 10 days as a chance to get a feel for the new city and have a holiday in your new home. Good luck!!
     

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